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Percona Server 5.6.16-64.1 is now available

 | March 17, 2014 |  Posted In: Events and Announcements, MySQL, Percona Server, Percona Software

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Percona Server version 5.6.16-64.1
Percona Server version 5.6.16-64.1

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.6.16-64.1 on March 17th, 2014 (Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories.

Based on MySQL 5.6.16, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.6.16-64.1 is the current GA release in the Percona Server 5.6 series. All of Percona’s software is open-source and free, all the details of the release can be found in the 5.6.16-64.1 milestone at Launchpad.

Bugs Fixed:

  • After installing the auth_socket plugin any local user might get root access to the server. If you’re using this plugin upgrade is advised. This is a regression, introduced in Percona Server 5.6.11-60.3. Bug fixed #1289599
  • The new client and server packages included files with paths that were conflicting with the ones in mysql-libs package on CentOS. Bug fixed #1278516.
  • A clean installation of Percona-Server-server-55 on CentOS would fail due to a typo in mysql_install_db call. Bug fixed #1291247.
  • libperconaserverclient18.1 Debian/Ubuntu packages depended on multiarch-support, which is not available on all the supported distribution versions. Bug fixed #1291628.
  • The InnoDB file system mutex was being locked incorrectly if Atomic write support for Fusion-io devices was enabled. Bug fixed #1287098.
  • Slave I/O thread wouldn’t attempt to automatically reconnect to the master after a network time-out (error: 1159). Bug fixed #1268729 (upstream #71374).

Renaming the libmysqlclient to libperconaserverclient

This release fixes some of the issues caused by the libmysqlclient rename to libperconaserverclient in Percona Server 5.6.16-64.0. The old name was conflicting with the upstream libmysqlclient.

Except for packaging, libmysqlclient and libperconaserverclient of the same version do not have any differences. Users who previously compiled software against Percona-provided libmysqlclient will either need to install the corresponding package of their distribution, such as distribution or Oracle-provided package for CentOS and libmysqlclient18 for Ubuntu/Debian or recompile against libperconaserverclient. Another workaround option is to create a symlink from libperconaserverclient.so.18.0.0 to libmysqlclient.so.18.0.0.

Release notes for Percona Server 5.6.16-64.1 are available in our online documentation. Bugs can be reported on the launchpad bug tracker.

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3 Comments

  • If someone needs libmysqlclient.so.X and doesn’t want additionally to install mysql/mariadb libraries then these commands rename libperconaserverclient back to libmysqlclient:

    find . -name CMakeLists.txt -exec sed -i -e ‘s#perconaserverclient#mysqlclient#g’ “{}” “;”
    sed -i -e ‘s#perconaserverclient#mysqlclient#g’ libmysql/libmysql.{ver.in,map}

    + normal build

  • While “arekm” provides a reasonable compile-time solution to restoring libperconaserverclient.so to libmysqlclient.so, I am requesting that Percona make this a compile-time configuration option.

    Percona Server is billed as a “drop-in” replacement for Oracle MySQL. When I build from source, I need the resulting binaries, libraries, and support files to be named exactly as they are in a full Oracle MySQL installation. I understand that some Linux distros split the client-side and server-side components, but others (such as Slackware) do not.

    There has got to be a better way of supporting all distros – whether MySQL is monolithic or split into client-server components. Making the choice configurable when building the package would go a long way toward alleviating the problems we are seeing.

    Thank you for your consideration.

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