How to Restore MySQL Logical Backups

restore MySQL logical backupsThe ability to restore MySQL logical backups is a significant part of disaster recovery procedures. It’s a last line of defense.

Even if you lost all data from a production server, physical backups (data files snapshot created with an offline copy or with Percona XtraBackup) could show the same internal database structure corruption as in production data. Backups in a simple plain text format allow you to avoid such corruptions and migrate between database formats (e.g., during a software upgrade and downgrade), or even help with migration from completely different database solution.

Unfortunately, the restore speed for logical backups is usually bad, and for a big database, it could require days or even weeks to get data back. Thus it’s important to tune backups and MySQL for the fastest data restore and change settings back before production operations.

Disclaimer

All results are specific to my combination of hardware and dataset but could be used as an illustration for MySQL database tuning procedures related to logical backup restore.

Benchmark

There is no general advice for tuning a MySQL database for a bulk logical backup load, and any parameter should be verified with a test on your hardware and database. In this article, we will explore some variables that help that process. To illustrate the tuning procedure, I’ve downloaded IMDB CSV files and created a MySQL database with pyimdb.

You may repeat the whole benchmark procedure or just look at settings changed and resulting times.

Database:

  • 16GB – InnoDB database size
  • 6.6GB – uncompressed mysqldump sql
  • 5.8GB – uncompressed CSV + create table statements.

The simplest restore procedure for logical backups created by the mysqldump tool:

This requires slightly more than two hours to restore the backup into the MySQL instance started with default settings.

I’m using the Docker image percona:latest – it contains Percona Server 5.7.20-19 running on a laptop with 16GB RAM, Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7700HQ CPU @ 2.80GHz, two disks: SSD KINGSTON RBU-SNS and HDD HGST HTS721010A9.

Let’s start with some “good” settings: buffer pool bigger than default, 2x1GB transaction log files, disable sync (because we are using slow HDD), and set big values for IO capacity,
the load should be faster with big batches thus use 1GB for max_allowed_packet.

Values were chosen to be bigger than the default MySQL parameters because I’m trying to see the difference between the usually suggested values (like 80% of RAM should belong to InnoDB buffer pool).

The load is IO bounded, and there is no reaction on set global foreign_key_checks=0 and unique_checks=0 because these variables are already disabled in the dump file.

How can we reduce IO?

Disable InnoDB double write: --innodb_doublewrite=0

A huge improvement, but we still have an IO-bounded load.

We will not be able to improve load time significantly for IO bounded load. Let’s move to SSD:

Is it vital to disable disk sync for the InnoDB transaction log?

There is no significant difference.

By default, mysqldump produces SQL data, but it could also save data to CSV format:

We’re still using only one CPU core, let’s improve the load with the –use-threads=4 option:

In the end, the load is still not fully parallel due to a big table: all other tables are loaded, but one thread is still active.

Let’s split CSV files into smaller ones. For example, 100k rows in each file and load with GNU/parallel:

Split is not free, but you can split your dump files right after backup.

The load is parallel now, but the single big table strikes back with ‘setting auto-inc lock’ in SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUSG

Using the --innodb_autoinc_lock_mode=2 option fixes this issue: 16m2.567s.

We got slightly better results with just mysqlimport --use-threads=4. Let’s check if hyperthreading helps and if the problem caused by “parallel” tool:

  • Using four parallel jobs for load: 17m3.662s
  • Using four parallel jobs for load and two threads: 16m4.218s

There is no difference between GNU/Parallel and --use-threads option of mysqlimport.

Why 100k rows? With 500k rows: 15m33.258s

Now we have performance better than for mysqlimport --use-threads=4.

How about 1M rows at once? Just 16m52.357s.

I see periodic flushing logs message with bigger transaction logs (2x4GB): 12m18.160s: