Docker MySQL Replication 101

Precona Server DockerIn this blog post, we’ll discuss some of the basics regarding Docker MySQL replication. Docker has gained widespread popularity in recent years as a lightweight alternative to virtualization. It is ideal for building virtual development and testing environments. The solution is flexible and seamlessly integrates with popular CI tools.

 

This post walks through the setup of MySQL replication with Docker using Percona Server 5.6 images. To keep things simple we’ll configure a pair of instances and override only the most important variables for replication. You can add whatever other variables you want to override in the configuration files for each instance.

Note: the configuration described here is suitable for development or testing. We’ve also used the operating system repository packages; for the latest version use the official Docker images. The steps described can be used to setup more slaves if required, as long as each slave has a different server-id.

First, install Docker and pull the Percona images (this will take some time and is only executed once):

Now create locally persisted directories for the:

  1. Instance configuration
  2. Data files

Great, now we’re ready start our instances and configure replication. Launch the master node, configure the replication user and get the initial replication co-ordinates:

If you look carefully at the “docker run” command for masterdb, you’ll notice we’ve defined two paths to share from local storage:

  • This maps the local “/opt/Docker/masterdb/data” to the masterdb’s container’s “/var/lib/mysql path”
  • All files within the datadir “/var/lib/mysql” persist locally on the host running docker rather than in the container

  • This maps the local “/opt/Docker/masterdb/cnf” directory to the container’s “/etc/mysql/conf.d” path
  • The configuration files for the masterdb instance persist locally as well
  • Remember these files augment or override the file in “/etc/mysql/my.cnf” within the container (i.e., defaults will be used for all other variables)

We’re done setting up the master, so let’s continue with the slave instance. For this instance the “docker run” command also includes the “–link masterdb:mysql” command, which links the slave instance to the master instance for replication.

After starting the instance, set the replication co-ordinates captured in the previous step:

Almost ready to go! The last step is to start replication and verify that replication running: