Tag - benchmark

ClickHouse: New Open Source Columnar Database

Clickhouse

For this blog post, I’ve decided to try ClickHouse: an open source column-oriented database management system developed by Yandex (it currently powers Yandex.Metrica, the world’s second-largest web analytics platform).
In my previous set of posts, I tested Apache Spark for big data analysis and used Wikipedia page statistics as a data source. I’ve used the same data as […]

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PostgreSQL and MySQL: Millions of Queries per Second

PostgreSQL and MySQL

This blog compares how PostgreSQL and MySQL handle millions of queries per second.
Anastasia: Can open source databases cope with millions of queries per second? Many open source advocates would answer “yes.” However, assertions aren’t enough for well-grounded proof. That’s why in this blog post, we share the benchmark testing results from Alexander Korotkov (CEO of […]

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tpcc-mysql benchmark tool: less random with multi-schema support

In this blog post, I’ll discuss changes I’ve made to the
tpcc-mysql benchmark tool. These changes make it less random and support multi-schema.
This post might only be interesting to performance researchers. The
tpcc-mysql benchmark to is what I use to test different hardware (as an example, see my previous post: https://www.percona.com/blog/2016/07/26/testing-samsung-storage-in-tpcc-mysql-benchmark-percona-server/).
The first change is support for multiple schemas, rather […]

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InnoDB vs TokuDB in LinkBench benchmark

Previously I tested Tokutek’s Fractal Trees (TokuMX & TokuMXse) as MongoDB storage engines – today let’s look into the MySQL area.
I am going to use modified LinkBench in a heavy IO-load.
I compared InnoDB without compression, InnoDB with 8k compression, TokuDB with quicklz compression.
Uncompressed datasize is 115GiB, and cachesize is 12GiB for InnoDB and 8GiB […]

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Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug.
First […]

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