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Benchmark MongoDB with sysbench

 | May 13, 2016 |  Posted In: Benchmarks, MongoDB

Benchmark MongoDB with sysbench

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how to benchmark MongoDB with sysbench. In an earlier post, I mentioned our use of sysbench-mongodb (via this fork) to run benchmarks of MongoDB servers. I now want to share our work extending sysbench to make it work with MongoDB. If you’re not familiar with sysbench, it’s a great project developed […]

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Monitoring MongoDB Response Time

 | February 26, 2016 |  Posted In: MongoDB, Prometheus, Query Analytics

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how using Prometheus can help with monitoring MongoDB response time. I am currently comparing the performance of different storage engines on Percona Server for MongoDB, using a slightly customized version of Tim Callaghan’s sysbench-mongodb. Since I’m interested in measuring response time for database operations, I created a very simple exporter of response time […]

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InnoDB and TokuDB on AWS

 | February 1, 2016 |  Posted In: Benchmarks, InnoDB, TokuDB

In a recent post, Vadim compared the performance of Amazon Aurora and Percona Server on AWS. This time, I am comparing write throughput for InnoDB and TokuDB, using the same workload (sysbench oltp/update/update_non_index) and a similar set-up (r3.xlarge instance, with general purpose ssd, io2000 and io3000 volumes) to his experiments. All the runs used 16 threads for sysbench, and the following […]

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Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

and  | July 11, 2014 |  Posted In: Insight for DBAs, MySQL, MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

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High Availability with MySQL Fabric: Part II

and  | May 30, 2014 |  Posted In: High-availability, Insight for DBAs, MySQL

This is the third post in our MySQL Fabric series. If you missed the previous two, we started with an overall introduction, and then a discussion of MySQL Fabric’s high-availability (HA) features. MySQL Fabric was RC when we started this series, but it went GA recently. You can read the press release here, and see this blog post from Oracle’s Mats […]

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High Availability with MySQL Fabric: Part I

and  | May 15, 2014 |  Posted In: High-availability, Insight for DBAs, MySQL

In our previous post, we introduced the MySQL Fabric utility and said we would dig deeper into it. This post is the first part of our test of MySQL Fabric’s High Availability (HA) functionality. Today, we’ll review MySQL Fabric’s HA concepts, and then walk you through the setup of a 3-node cluster with one Primary and two […]

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Managing farms of MySQL servers with MySQL Fabric

and  | April 25, 2014 |  Posted In: High-availability, Insight for DBAs, Insight for Developers, MySQL

While built-in replication has been a major cause for MySQL’s wide adoption, official tools to help DBAs manage replication topologies have typically been missing from the picture. The community has produced many good products to fill in this gap, but recently, Oracle has been filling it too with the addition of MySQL Utilities to the mix. One […]

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