EmergencyEMERGENCY? Get 24/7 Help Now!

Memory allocation in Stored Function

 | August 26, 2007 |  Posted In: Insight for DBAs

PREVIOUS POST
NEXT POST

UPDATE : Post is not actual anymore

Not so long time ago I had task to update string column in table with 10mil+ rows, and, as the manipulation was non-trivial, I decided this task is good to try Stored Function. Function written – go ahead. Since 5 min I got totally frozen box with no free memory and giant swap.

The case was worth to look deeply – let’s try simple table (experiments with MySQL 5.0.45)

and simple function I’ve found in MySQL manual:

Originally I used UPDATE statement, but for avoiding I/O and allocating os cashes let’s check only select:

and here is vmstat 5 output:

As you see MySQL ate 5GB of memory in 85 sec. That makes things clearer. As I understand MySQL allocates memory in each call of Stored Function, but de-allocates it only at the end of statement. This makes usage of Stored Function very limited from my point of view. And, yes, if you are looking for a way to DoS attack of your hosting provider – this is worth to try.

PREVIOUS POST
NEXT POST
Vadim Tkachenko

Vadim Tkachenko co-founded Percona in 2006 and serves as its Chief Technology Officer. Vadim leads Percona Labs, which focuses on technology research and performance evaluations of Percona’s and third-party products. Percona Labs designs no-gimmick tests of hardware, filesystems, storage engines, and databases that surpass the standard performance and functionality scenario benchmarks. Vadim’s expertise in LAMP performance and multi-threaded programming help optimize MySQL and InnoDB internals to take full advantage of modern hardware. Oracle Corporation and its predecessors have incorporated Vadim’s source code patches into the mainstream MySQL and InnoDB products. He also co-authored the book High Performance MySQL: Optimization, Backups, and Replication 3rd Edition.

8 Comments

  • A similar (if not the same) problem was reported in Bug #17260 – “Multiple invocations of triggers or stored functions hog memory”. Fixed in 5.0.22 and 5.1.11 (or not).

  • Dmitri, similar problem but seems a different cause, see:

    [22 May 2006 3:50] Paul DuBois

    Noted in 5.022, 5.1.11 changelogs.

    Revised memory allocation for local objects within stored
    functions and triggers to avoid memory leak for repeated
    function or trigger invocation.

    That was a memory leak, this seems like a design problem

  • Hi,

    your work is greate, after reading some of your posts, i decide to run my website in innodb.

    but I’m using xampp on localhost. ( downloadable from: apachefriends.org )

    this is the best localhost software.
    but, in mysql hasnt innodb storage engine… can you tell me how can i add this?

    thanks.

  • Massoud,

    For general questions please use our forums.
    To be honest I did not try xampp , perhaps it has no compiled InnoDB.
    Please check SHOW ENGINES output.
    If InnoDB is NO – then you should install mysql by yourself from dev.mysql.coms site.

  • Just an update on this – this is Bug#30663, http://bugs.mysql.com/30663, which is in state “Can’t repeat”.
    I have a very strong inclination to think that something got messed up on this box – we indeed had a similar bug in stored functions, but it was a while ago.

  • Konstantin.

    I wrote another post
    http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2007/09/07/withdrawal-of-memory-allocation-in-stored-function/

    Sorry again for confusion.

Leave a Reply

 
 

Percona’s widely read Percona Data Performance blog highlights our expertise in enterprise-class software, support, consulting and managed services solutions for both MySQL® and MongoDB® across traditional and cloud-based platforms. The decades of experience represented by our consultants is found daily in numerous and relevant blog posts.

Besides specific database help, the blog also provides notices on upcoming events and webinars.
Want to get weekly updates listing the latest blog posts? Subscribe to our blog now! Submit your email address below and we’ll send you an update every Friday at 1pm ET.

No, thank you. Please do not ask me again.