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Search Results for: you do not have enough memory

Covering Indexes: How many indexes do you need?

I’ve recently been blogging about how partitioning is a poor man’s answer to covering indexes. I got the following comment from Jaimie Sirovich: “There are many environments where you could end up creating N! indices …

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Replication of MEMORY (HEAP) Tables

Some Applications need to store some transient data which is frequently regenerated and MEMORY table look like a very good match for this sort of tasks. Unfortunately this will bite when you will be looking …

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InnoDB memory allocation, ulimit, and OpenSUSE

I recently encountered an interesting case. A customer reported that mysqld crashed on start on OpenSUSE 11.2 kernel 2.6.31.12-0.2-desktop x86_64   with 96 GB RAM when the innodb_buffer_pool_size was set to anything more than 62 …

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The Doom of Multiple Storage Engines

One of the big “Selling Points” of MySQL is support for Multiple Storage engines, and from the glance view it is indeed great to provide users with same top level SQL interface allowing them to …

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Should I buy a Fast SSD or more memory?

While a scale-out solution has traditionally been popular for MySQL, it’s interesting to see what room we now have to scale up – cheap memory, fast storage, better power efficiency.  There certainly are a lot …

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Why you should ignore MySQL’s key cache hit ratio

I have not caused a fist fight in a while, so it’s time to take off the gloves. I claim that somewhere around of 99% of advice about tuning MySQL’s key cache hit ratio is …

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Give me 8 hours, and I’ll help you build a better application

I have run into a number of cases recently that all had a similar look and feel. In most of these cases, the symptoms were very complicated, but they boiled down to just a few …

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Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons

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When would you use SAN with MySQL ?

One question which comes up very often is when one should use SAN with MySQL, which is especially popular among people got used to Oracle or other Enterprise database systems which are quite commonly deployed …

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How much memory can MySQL use in the worst case?

I vaguely recall a couple of blog posts recently asking something like “what’s the formula to compute mysqld’s worst-case maximum memory usage?” Various formulas are in wide use, but none of them is fully correct. …

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