Emergency

Search Results for: slow updates

Why “insert … on duplicate key update” May Be Slow, by Incurring Disk Seeks

In my post on June 18th, I explained why the semantics of normal ad-hoc insertions with a primary key are expensive because they require disk seeks on large data sets. I previously explained why it …

Read More
 

A few administrative updates

I wanted to write a few administrative updates in one so I didn’t spam everyone’s feed readers too much. Here we go: We’ve had reports of some lost comments.  We reported this via Twitter a …

Read More
 

Updated msl (microslow) patch, installation walk-through!

For a couple of months there have been no updates to our msl patch, however recently I managed some time to change this. The functionality was extended a little bit and what’s even more important …

Read More
 

Tradeoffs: Updates versus Range Queries

Sorry for the delay, now on to range queries and lenient updates. Let’s call them queries and updates, for short. So far, I’ve shown that B-trees (and any of a number of other data structures) …

Read More
 

How Fast Can Updates Run?

Last time, I introduced the notion of strict and lenient updates. Now it’s time to see what the performance characteristics are of each. Just to rehash, we are focusing on the storage engine (a la …

Read More
 

Updates & Discipline

So far, I’ve analyzed point and range queries. Now it’s time to talk about insertions and deletions. We’ll call the combination updates. Updates come in two flavors, and today we’ll cover both. Depending on the …

Read More
 

ObjectRocket’s David Murphy talks about MongoDB, Percona Live Amsterdam

Say hello to David Murphy, lead DBA and MongoDB Master at ObjectRocket (a Rackspace company). David works on sharding, tool building, very large-scale issues and high-performance MongoDB architecture. Prior to ObjectRocket he was a MySQL/NoSQL …

Read More
 

Find unused indexes on MongoDB and TokuMX

Finding and removing unused indexes is a pretty common technique to improve overall performance of relational databases. Less indexes means faster insert and updates but also less disk space used. The usual way to do …

Read More
 

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single …

Read More