Search Results for: shard

Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons

Sharding and Time Base Partitioning

For large number of online applications once you implemented proper sharding you can consider your scaling problems solved – by getting more and more hardware you can grow. As I recently wrote it however does not mean it is the most optimal way by itself to do things. The “classical” sharding involves partitioning by user_id,site_id […]

MaxScale: A new tool to solve your MySQL scalability problems

Ever since MySQL replication has existed, people have dreamed of a good solution to automatically split read from write operations, sending the writes to the MySQL master and load balancing the reads over a set of MySQL slaves. While if at first it seems easy to solve, the reality is far more complex. First, the […]

Storing time-series data with MongoDB and TokuMX

Storing time-series data is a frequent pattern for databases – be it for logs or for any kind of monitoring. Such data has the following properties: records are inserted but also never updated, the insertion rate can be high and records are likely to expire after some time. MongoDB and TokuMX are both good fits […]

The value of MySQL Support

Years ago when I worked for the MySQL Support organization at the original MySQL AB, we spoke about MySQL Support as insurance and focused on a value proposition similar to that of car insurance. For your car to be fully covered, you must purchase car insurance before the incident happens – in fact most places […]

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Impressions from MongoDB Day London 2014

I visited MongoDB Day in London on November 6. Here are a few observations: App-Developer Centric. It is interesting to see how much MongoDB is about developers; the ops side is something which is a necessary evil developers have to deal with. The ops topics covered in principle that there are no topics about choices […]

MySQL ring replication: Why it is a bad option

I’ve recently worked with customers using replication rings with 4+ servers; several servers accepting writes. The idea behind this design is always the same: by having multiple servers, you get high availability and by having multiple writer nodes, you get write scalability. Alas, this is simply not true. Here is why. High Availability Having several […]

Q&A: Putting MySQL Fabric to use

Martin Arrieta and I gave an online presentation last week on “Putting MySQL Fabric To Use.” If you missed it, you can find a recording and the slides here, and the vagrant environment we used plus a transcript of the commands we ran here (be sure to check out the ‘sharding’ branch, as that’s what we used […]