Search Results for: select * from where like

When the subselect runs faster

A few weeks ago, we had a query optimization request from one of our customer. The query was very simple like:

This column in the table is looks like this:

The table have 549252 rows and of course, there is an index on the col1. MySQL estimated the cardinality of that index as […]

Faster MySQL failover with SELECT mirroring

One of my favorite MySQL configurations for high availability is master-master replication, which is just like normal master-slave replication except that you can fail over in both directions. Aside from MySQL Cluster, which is more special-purpose, this is probably the best general-purpose way to get fast failover and a bunch of other benefits (non-blocking ALTER […]

MySQL indexing 101: a challenging single-table query

We discussed in an earlier post how to design indexes for many types of queries using a single table. Here is a real-world example of the challenges you will face when trying to optimize queries: two similar queries, but one is performing a full table scan while the other one is using the index we […]

MongoDB’s flexible schema: How to fix write amplification

Being schemaless is one of the key features of MongoDB. On the bright side this allows developers to easily modify the schema of their collections without waiting for the database to be ready to accept a new schema. However schemaless is not free and one of the drawbacks is write amplification. Let’s focus on that […]

Optimizer hints in MySQL 5.7.7 – The missed manual

In version MySQL 5.7.7 Oracle presented a new promising feature: optimizer hints. However it did not publish any documentation about the hints. The only note which I found in the user manual about the hints is: It is now possible to provide hints to the optimizer by including /*+ … */ comments following the SELECT, […]

Indexing 101: Optimizing MySQL queries on a single table

I have recently seen several cases when performance for MySQL queries on a single table was terrible. The reason was simple: the wrong indexes were added and so the execution plan was poor. Here are guidelines to help you optimize various kinds of single-table queries. Disclaimer: I will be presenting general guidelines and I do […]