Search Results for: read buffer size

read_buffer_size can break your replication

There are some variables that can affect the replication behavior and sometimes cause some big troubles. In this post I’m going to talk about read_buffer_size and how this variable together with max_allowed_packet can break your replication. The setup is a master-master replication with the following values: max_allowed_packet = 32M read_buffer_size = 100M To break the […]

MySQL: what read_buffer_size value is optimal ?

The more I work with MySQL Performance Optimization and Optimization for other applications the better I understand I have to less believe in common sense or common sense of documentation writers and do more benchmarks and performance research. I just recently wrote about rather surprising results with sort performance and today I’ve discovered even read_buffer_size […]

What exactly is read_rnd_buffer_size

Looking for documentation for read_rnd_buffer_size you would find descriptions such as “The read_rnd_buffer_size is used after a sort, when reading rows in sorted order. If you use many queries with ORDER BY, upping this can improve performance” which is cool but it does not really tell you how exactly read_rnd_buffer_size works as well as which […]

Getting EXPLAIN information from already running queries in MySQL 5.7

When a new version of MySQL is about to be released we read a lot of blog posts about the performance and scalability improvements. That’s good but sometimes we miss some small features that can help us a lot in our day-to-day tasks. One good example is the blog post that Aurimas wrote about a […]

Update on the InnoDB double-write buffer and EXT4 transactions

In a post, written a few months ago, I found that using EXT4 transactions with the “data=journal” mount option, improves the write performance significantly, by 55%, without putting data at risk. Many people commented on the post mentioning they were not able to reproduce the results and thus, I decided to further investigate in order […]

Worrying about the ‘InnoDB: detected cycle in LRU for buffer pool (…)’ message?

If you use Percona Server 5.5 and you have configured it to use multiple buffer pool instances than sooner or later you’ll see the following lines on the server’s error log and chances are you’ll be worried about them:

Worry not as this is mostly harmless. It’s becoming a February tradition for me (Fernando) […]

How well does your table fit in the InnoDB buffer pool in MySQL 5.6+?

Some time ago, Peter Zaitsev posted a blog titled “How well does your table fits in innodb buffer pool?” He used some special INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables developed for Percona Server 5.1 to report how much of each InnoDB table and index resides in your buffer pool. As Peter pointed out, you can use this view into […]

Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads. When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT […]

Percona Server: Improve Scalability with Percona Thread Pool

By default, for every client connection the MySQL server spawns a separate thread which will process all statements for this connection. This is the ‘one-thread-per-connection’ model. It’s simple and efficient until some number of connections N is reached. After this point performance of the MySQL server will degrade, mostly due to various contentions caused by […]

LVM read performance during snapshots

For the same customer I am exploring ZFS for backups, the twin server is using regular LVM and XFS. On this twin, I have setup mylvmbackup for a more conservative backup approach. I quickly found some odd behaviors, the backup was taking much longer than what I was expecting. It is not the first time […]