Search Results for: mysql sum time difference

MySQL indexing 101: a challenging single-table query

We discussed in an earlier post how to design indexes for many types of queries using a single table. Here is a real-world example of the challenges you will face when trying to optimize queries: two similar queries, but one is performing a full table scan while the other one is using the index we […]

Keep your MySQL data in sync when using Tungsten Replicator

MySQL replication isn’t perfect and sometimes our data gets out of sync, either by a failure in replication or human intervention. We are all familiar with Percona Toolkit’s pt-table-checksum and pt-table-sync to help us check and fix data inconsistencies – but imagine the following scenario where we mix regular replication with the Tungsten Replicator: We […]

Checking table definition consistency with mysqldiff

Data inconsistencies in replication environments are a pretty common. There are lots of posts that explain how to fix those using pt-table-checksum and pt-table-sync. Usually we only care about the data but from time to time we receive this question in support: How can I check the table definition consistency between servers? Replication also allow […]

5 free handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication

MySQL Replication is very simple to set up. In this post I’ll discuss its importance and five handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication. What is MySQL Replication? It’s the process of copying the (real-time events) data from one master instance to another slave instance and maintaining the redundant consistent data in a different […]

MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes

Over the past few months I’ve written a couple of posts about dangerous debt of InnoDB Transactional History and about the fact MVCC can be the cause of severe MySQL performance issues. In this post I will cover a related topic – InnoDB Transaction Isolation Modes, their relationship with MVCC (multi-version concurrency control) and how […]

Getting mutex information from MySQL’s performance_schema

We have been using SHOW ENGINE INNODB MUTEX command for years. It shows us mutex and rw-lock information that could be useful during service troubleshooting in case of performance problems. As Morgan Tocker announced in his blog post the command will be removed from MySQL 5.7 and we have to use performance_schema to get that […]

Tips from the trenches for over-extended MySQL DBAs

This post is a follow-up to my November 19 webinar, “Tips from the Trenches: A Guide to Preventing Downtime for the Over-Extended DBA,” during which I described some of the most common reasons DBAs experience avoidable downtime. The session was aimed at the “over-stretched DBA,” identified as the MySQL DBA short of time or an […]

Schema changes in MySQL for OpenStack Trove users

People using OpenStack Trove instances can hit a common issue in the MySQL world: how to perform schema change operations while minimizing the impact on the database server? Let’s explore the options that can allow online schema changes. Summary With MySQL 5.5, pt-online-schema-change from Percona Toolkit is your best option for large tables while regular […]

How to avoid hash collisions when using MySQL’s CRC32 function

Percona Toolkit’s  pt-table-checksum performs an online replication consistency check by executing checksum queries on the master, which produces different results on replicas that are inconsistent with the master – and the tool pt-table-sync synchronizes data efficiently between MySQL tables. The tools by default use the CRC32. Other good choices include MD5 and SHA1. If you have installed the FNV_64 user-defined function, pt-table-sync will […]

MySQL compression: Compressed and Uncompressed data size

MySQL has information_schema.tables that contain information such as “data_length” or “avg_row_length.” Documentation on this table however is quite poor, making an assumption that those fields are self explanatory – they are not when it comes to tables that employ compression. And this is where inconsistency is born. Lets take a look at the same table […]