Search Results for: mysql large ram my.cnf

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his […]

Notes from the Newb

Notes from the Newb. I’m relatively new to MySQL having come from the world of embedded micro-databases, and though I’m pretty familiar with a number of database systems, I’ve discovered that I have a lot to learn about MySQL. As a new member to the Percona team, I thought I’d have an ongoing blog theme […]

Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2 rerelease fixes non-restart issue

In our last 5.5 series release of Percona Server, we included a regression in the RPM packaging that prevented the server from restarting following an upgrade — instead, the server would remain stopped after the upgrade was completed regardless of its state before updating. This caused some problems for some users, especially if automatic upgrading was configured […]

thread_concurrency doesn’t do what you expect

Over the last months I’ve seen lots of customers trying to tune the thread concurrency inside MySQL with the variable thread_concurrency. Our advice is: stop wasting your time, it does nothing on GNU/Linux Some of the biggest GNU/Linux distributions includes the variable thread_concurrency in their my.cnf file by default. One example is Debian and its […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

A quest for the full InnoDB status

When running InnoDB you are able to dig into the engine internals, look at various gauges and counters, see past deadlocks and the list of all open transactions. This is in your reach with one simple command —

. On most occasions it works beautifully. The problems appear when you have a large spike in […]