Search Results for: mysql how many records in table

MySQL indexing 101: a challenging single-table query

We discussed in an earlier post how to design indexes for many types of queries using a single table. Here is a real-world example of the challenges you will face when trying to optimize queries: two similar queries, but one is performing a full table scan while the other one is using the index we […]

Indexing 101: Optimizing MySQL queries on a single table

I have recently seen several cases when performance for MySQL queries on a single table was terrible. The reason was simple: the wrong indexes were added and so the execution plan was poor. Here are guidelines to help you optimize various kinds of single-table queries. Disclaimer: I will be presenting general guidelines and I do […]

5 free handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication

MySQL Replication is very simple to set up. In this post I’ll discuss its importance and five handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication. What is MySQL Replication? It’s the process of copying the (real-time events) data from one master instance to another slave instance and maintaining the redundant consistent data in a different […]

Identifying useful info from MySQL row-based binary logs

As a MySQL DBA/consultant, it is part of my job to decode the MySQL binary logs – and there are a number of reasons for doing that. In this post, I’ll explain how you can get the important information about your write workload using MySQL row-based binary logs and a simple awk script. First, it […]

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to […]

File carving methods for the MySQL DBA

This is a long overdue blog post from London’s 44con Cyber Security conference back in September. A lot of old memories were brought to the front as it were; the one I’m going to cover in this blog post is: file carving. So what is file carving? despite the terminology it’s not going to be a […]

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]