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Search Results for: memory to disk ratio

Using Cgroups to Limit MySQL and MongoDB memory usage

Quite often, especially for benchmarks, I am trying to limit available memory for a database server (usually for MySQL, but recently for MongoDB also). This is usually needed to test database performance in scenarios with …


What’s new in TokuMX 1.4, Part 5: Faster chunk migrations

We just released version 1.4.0 of TokuMX, our high-performance distribution of MongoDB. There are a lot of improvements in this version (release notes), the most of any release yet. In this series of blog posts, …


Limited disk space? Compact backups with Percona Xtrabackup 2.1

One very interesting feature, “Compact Backup,” is introduced in Percona XtraBackup 2.1. You can run “compact backups” with the  –compact option, which is very useful for those who have limited disk space to keep the MySQL …


Aligning IO on a hard disk RAID – the Benchmarks

In the first part of this article I have showed how I align IO, now I want to share results of the benchmark that I have been running to see how much benefit can we …


InnoDB Flushing: a lot of memory and slow disk

You may have seen in the last couple of weekly news posts that Baron mentioned we are working on a new adaptive flushing algorithm in InnoDB. In fact, we already have three such algorithms in …


Replication of MEMORY (HEAP) Tables

Some Applications need to store some transient data which is frequently regenerated and MEMORY table look like a very good match for this sort of tasks. Unfortunately this will bite when you will be looking …


TokuDB speeds up “replace” and “insert ignore” operations by relaxing the affected rows constraint

In posts on June 30 and July 6, we explained how implementing the commands “replace into” and “insert ignore” with TokuDB’s fractal trees data structures can be two orders of magnitude faster than implementing them …


Disk seeks are evil, so let’s avoid them, pt. 4

Continuing in the theme from previous posts, I’d like to examine another case where we can eliminate all disk seeks from a MySQL operation and therefore get two orders-of-magnitude speedup. The general outline of these …


Making Deletions Fast, by Avoiding Disk Seeks

In my last post, I discussed how fractal tree data structures can be up to two orders of magnitude faster on deletions over B-trees. I focused on the deletions where the row entry is known …


Disk seeks are evil, so let’s avoid them, pt. 3 (Deletions)

As mentioned in parts 1 and 2, having many disk seeks are bad (they slow down performance). Fractal tree data structures minimize disk seeks on ad-hoc insertions, whereas B-trees practically guarantee that disk seeks are …