Search Results for: innodb file format

InnoDB file formats: Here is one pitfall to avoid

UPDATED: explaining the role of innodb_strict_mode and correcting introduction of innodb_file_format Compressed tables is an example of an InnoDB feature that became available with the Barracuda file format, introduced in the InnoDB plugin. They can bring significant gains in raw performance and scalability: given the data is stored in a compressed format the amount of […]

Future InnoDB File Formats

Looking into InnoDB docs I found list of names of future InnoDB file formats: Antelope, Barracuda, Cheetah, Dragon, Elk, Fox, Gazelle, Hornet, Impala, Jaguar, Kangaroo, Leopard, Moose, Nautilus, Ocelot, Porpoise, Quail, Rabbit, Shark, Tiger, Urchin, Viper, Whale, X, Y and Zebra. Aren’t there animals starting on X and Y?

Getting EXPLAIN information from already running queries in MySQL 5.7

When a new version of MySQL is about to be released we read a lot of blog posts about the performance and scalability improvements. That’s good but sometimes we miss some small features that can help us a lot in our day-to-day tasks. One good example is the blog post that Aurimas wrote about a […]

Illustrating Primary Key models in InnoDB and their impact on disk usage

On a recent engagement I worked with a customer who makes extensive use of UUID() values for their Primary Key and stores it as char(36), and their row count on this example table has grown to over 1 billion rows. The table is INSERT-only (no UPDATEs or DELETEs), and the bulk of their retrieval are PK […]

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug. First […]

Getting mutex information from MySQL’s performance_schema

We have been using SHOW ENGINE INNODB MUTEX command for years. It shows us mutex and rw-lock information that could be useful during service troubleshooting in case of performance problems. As Morgan Tocker announced in his blog post the command will be removed from MySQL 5.7 and we have to use performance_schema to get that […]

How well does your table fit in the InnoDB buffer pool in MySQL 5.6+?

Some time ago, Peter Zaitsev posted a blog titled “How well does your table fits in innodb buffer pool?” He used some special INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables developed for Percona Server 5.1 to report how much of each InnoDB table and index resides in your buffer pool. As Peter pointed out, you can use this view into […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]