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Search Results for: how to get ram cheap

Cage Match: OldSQL, NoSQL and NewSQL

  When I interviewed at Tokutek, I met a team of distinguished academics and engineers who could calmly and thoughtfully wax eloquent about the finer points of B-tree and Fractal Tree™ indexing,  drive I/Os, and …


Using any general purpose computer as a special purpose SIMD computer

Often times, from a computing perspective, one must run a function on a large amount of input. Often times, the same function must be run on many pieces of input, and this is a very …


The two even more fundamental performance metrics

In a recent blog post, I wrote about four fundamental metrics for system performance analysis. These are throughput, residence time, “weighted time” (the sum of all residence times in the observation period — the terminology …


MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection …


SLC vs MLC

(cross posting from SSDPeformanceBlog.com ) All modern solid state drives use NAND memory based on SLC (single level cell) or MLC (multi level cell) technologies. Not going into physical details – SLC basically stores 1 …


Should I buy a Fast SSD or more memory?

While a scale-out solution has traditionally been popular for MySQL, it’s interesting to see what room we now have to scale up – cheap memory, fast storage, better power efficiency.  There certainly are a lot …


“Shard early, shard often”

I wrote a post a while back that said why you don’t want to shard.  In that post that I tried to explain that hardware advances such as 128G of RAM being so cheap is …


Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons


Long Index Keys

In this post we’ll describe a query that accrued significant performance advantages from using a relatively long index key. (This posting is by Zardosht and Bradley.) We ran across this query recently when interacting with …


RAID vs SSD vs FusionIO

In benchmarks passion (see my two previous posts) I managed to setup all three devices (RAID was on board; Intel X25-E SSD connected to HighPoint controller, FusionIO card) on our working horse Dell PowerEdge R900 …