Search Results for: how many tables is too much mysql

Auditing MySQL with McAfee and MongoDB

Greetings everyone! Let’s discuss a 3rd Party auditing solution to MySQL and how we can leverage MongoDB® to make sense out of all of that data. The McAfee MySQL Audit plugin does a great job of capturing, at low level, activities within a MySQL server. It does this through some non-standard APIs which is why installing […]

MaxScale: A new tool to solve your MySQL scalability problems

Ever since MySQL replication has existed, people have dreamed of a good solution to automatically split read from write operations, sending the writes to the MySQL master and load balancing the reads over a set of MySQL slaves. While if at first it seems easy to solve, the reality is far more complex. First, the […]

Yelp IT! A talk with 3 Yelp MySQL DBAs on Percona Live & more

Founded in 2004 to help people find great local businesses, Yelp has some 135 million monthly unique visitors. With those traffic volumes Yelp’s 300+ engineers are constantly working to keep things moving smoothly – and when you move that fast you learn many things. Fortunately for the global MySQL community, three Yelp DBAs will be […]

Is MySQL’s innodb_file_per_table slowing you down?

MySQL’s innodb_file_per_table is a wonderful thing – most of the time. Having every table use its own .ibd file allows you to easily reclaim space when dropping or truncating tables. But in some use cases, it may cause significant performance issues. Many of you in the audience are responsible for running automated tests on your […]

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug. First […]

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to […]

What happens when your application cannot open yet another connection to MySQL

Have you ever experienced a situation where one moment you can connect to the MySQL database and the next moment  you cannot, only to be able to connect again a second later? As you may know one cannot open infinite connections with MySQL. There’s a practical limit and more often than not it is imposed […]

Optimizing MySQL for Zabbix

This blog post was inspired by my visit at the annual Zabbix Conference in Riga, Latvia this year, where I gave a couple of talks on MySQL and beyond. It was a two day single-track event with some 200 participants, a number of interesting talks on Zabbix (and related technologies) and really well-organized evening activities. […]

MySQL 5.6 Full Text Search Throwdown: Webinar Q&A

Yesterday (Oct. 22) I gave a presentation titled “MySQL 5.6 Full Text Search Throwdown.” If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time for during the session, […]