Search Results for: e=t

MongoDB with Percona TokuMXse – experimental build RC5 is available!

While our engineering team is working on finalizing the TokuMXse storage engine, I want to provide an experimental build that you can try and test MongoDB 3.0 with our storage engine. It is available here percona.com/downloads/TESTING/Percona-TokuMXse-rc5/percona-tokumxse-3.0.3pre-rc5.tar.gz To start MongoDB with TokuMXse storage engine use:

I am looking for your feedback!

LinkBenchX: benchmark based on arrival request rate

An idea for a benchmark based on the “arrival request” rate that I wrote about in a post headlined “Introducing new type of benchmark” back in 2012 was implemented in Sysbench. However, Sysbench provides only a simple workload, so to be able to compare InnoDB with TokuDB, and later MongoDB with Percona TokuMX, I wanted […]

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When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his […]

Examining the TokuDB MySQL storage engine file structure

As we know different storage engines in MySQL have different file structures. Every table in MySQL 5.6 must have a .frm file in the database directory matching the table name. But where the rest of the data resides depends on the storage engine. For MyISAM we have .MYI and .MYD files in the database directory […]

Percona Server with TokuDB (beta): Installation, configuration

My previous post was an introduction to the TokuDB storage engine and aimed at explaining the basics of its design and how it differentiates from InnoDB/XtraDB. This post is all about motivating you to give it a try and have a look for yourself. Percona Server is not officially supporting TokuDB as of today, though the […]

Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads. When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT […]

Innotop: A real-time, advanced investigation tool for MySQL

GUI monitoring tools for MySQL are not always suitable for all our needs or situations. Most of them are designed to provide historical views into what happens to our database over time rather then real-time insight into current MySQL server status. Excellent free tools for this include Cacti, Zabbix, Ganglia, Nagios, etc. But each of […]

How to fix your PRM cluster when upgrading to RHEL/CentOS 6.4

If you are using Percona Replication Manager (PRM) with RHEL/CentOS prior to 6.4, upgrading your distribution to 6.4 may break your cluster. In this post I will explain you how to fix your cluster in case it breaks after a distribution upgrade that implies an update of pacemaker from 1.1.7 to 1.18. You can also […]

Benchmarking Percona Server TokuDB vs InnoDB

After compiling Percona Server with TokuDB, of course I wanted to compare InnoDB performance vs TokuDB. I have a particular workload I’m interested in testing – it is an insert-intensive workload (which is TokuDB’s strong suit) with some roll-up aggregation, which should produce updates in-place (I will use INSERT .. ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE statements […]