Search Results for: concurrency

MySQL and the SSB – Part 2 – MyISAM vs InnoDB low concurrency

This blog post is part two in what is now a continuing series on the Star Schema Benchmark. In my previous blog post I compared MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.6.10, both with default settings using only the InnoDB storage engine.  In my testing I discovered that innodb_old_blocks_time had an effect on performance of the benchmark.  There was […]

Why MySQL Performance at Low Concurrency is Important

A few weeks ago I wrote about “MySQL Performance at High Concurrency” and why it is important, which was followed up by Vadim’s post on ThreadPool in Percona Server providing some great illustration on the topic. This time I want to target an opposite question: why MySQL performance at low concurrency is important for you. […]

Why do we care about MySQL Performance at High Concurrency?

In many MySQL Benchmarks we can see performance compared with rather high level of concurrency. In some cases reaching 4,000 or more concurrent threads which hammer databases as quickly as possible resulting in hundreds or even thousands concurrently active queries. The question is how common is it in production ? The typical metrics to use […]

thread_concurrency doesn’t do what you expect

Over the last months I’ve seen lots of customers trying to tune the thread concurrency inside MySQL with the variable thread_concurrency. Our advice is: stop wasting your time, it does nothing on GNU/Linux Some of the biggest GNU/Linux distributions includes the variable thread_concurrency in their my.cnf file by default. One example is Debian and its […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

InnoDB thread concurrency

InnoDB has a mechanism to regulate count of threads working inside InnoDB. innodb_thread_concurrency is variable which set this count, and there are two friendly variables innodb_thread_sleep_delay and innodb_concurrency_tickets. I’ll try to explain how it works. MySQL has pluginable architecture which divides work between mysql common code (parser, optimizer) and storage engine. From storage engine’s point […]

Mess with innodb_thread_concurrency

In MySQL 5.0.19 the meaning of innodb_thread_concurrency variable was changed (yeah, again). Now innodb_thread_concurrency=0 means unlimitied count of concurrent threads inside InnoDB. It’s logical, but there was long way. In MySQL versions below 5.0.8 for unlimited threads you had to set innodb_thread_concurrency over 500 (and default value for innodb_thread_concurrency was 8 ). Starting with MySQL […]

MongoDB / TokuMX plugin for LinkBench (Part 1)

“There’s no benchmark for how life’s “supposed” to happen. There is no ideal world for you to wait around for. The world is always just what it is now, it’s up to you how you respond to it.” ― Isaac Marion, Warm Bodies At one time or another, most of us have heard some version […]

LinkBenchX: benchmark based on arrival request rate

An idea for a benchmark based on the “arrival request” rate that I wrote about in a post headlined “Introducing new type of benchmark” back in 2012 was implemented in Sysbench. However, Sysbench provides only a simple workload, so to be able to compare InnoDB with TokuDB, and later MongoDB with Percona TokuMX, I wanted […]