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Search Results for: auto increment performance

New mydumper 0.6.1 release offers performance and usability features

One of the tasks within Percona Remote DBA is to ensure we have reliable backups with minimal impact. To accomplish this, one of the tools our team uses is called mydumper. We use mydumper for …

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Increasing slow query performance with the parallel query execution

MySQL and Scaling-up (using more powerful hardware) was always a hot topic. Originally MySQL did not scale well with multiple CPUs; there were times when InnoDB performed poorer with more  CPU cores than with less CPU cores. …

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InnoDB Full-text Search in MySQL 5.6: Part 3, Performance

This is part 3 of a 3 part series covering the new InnoDB full-text search features in MySQL 5.6. To catch up on the previous parts, see part 1 or part 2 Some of you …

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Benchmarking single-row insert performance on Amazon EC2

I have been working for a customer benchmarking insert performance on Amazon EC2, and I have some interesting results that I wanted to share. I used a nice and effective tool iiBench which has been …

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Avoiding auto-increment holes on InnoDB with INSERT IGNORE

Are you using InnoDB tables on MySQL version 5.1.22 or newer? If so, you probably have gaps in your auto-increment columns. A simple INSERT IGNORE query creates gaps for every ignored insert, but this is …

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Flexviews – part 3 – improving query performance using materialized views

Combating “data drift” In my first post in this series, I described materialized views (MVs). An MV is essentially a cached result set at one point in time. The contents of the MV will become …

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Extending Index for Innodb tables can hurt performance in a surprising way

One schema optimization we often do is extending index when there are queries which can use more key part. Typically this is safe operation, unless index length increases dramatically queries which can use index can …

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A workaround for the performance problems of TEMPTABLE views

MySQL supports two different algorithms for views: the MERGE algorithm and the TEMPTABLE algorithm. These two algorithms differ greatly. A view which uses the MERGE algorithm can merge filter conditions into the view query itself. …

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Better Primary Keys, a Benefit to TokuDB’s Auto Increment Semantics

In our last post, Bradley described how auto increment works in TokuDB. In this post, I explain one of our implementation’s big benefits, the ability to combine better primary keys with clustered primary keys. In …

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Autoincrement Semantics

In this post I’m going to talk about how TokuDB’s implementation of auto increment works, and contrast it to the behavior of MyISAM and InnoDB. We feel that the TokuDB behavior is easier to understand, …

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