Search Results for: How much memory can MySQL use

MySQL indexing 101: a challenging single-table query

We discussed in an earlier post how to design indexes for many types of queries using a single table. Here is a real-world example of the challenges you will face when trying to optimize queries: two similar queries, but one is performing a full table scan while the other one is using the index we […]

Choosing a good sharding key in MongoDB (and MySQL)

MongoDB 3.0 was recently released. Instead of focusing on what’s new – that is so easy to find, let’s rather talk about something that has not changed a lot since the early MongoDB days. This topic is sharding and most specifically: how to choose a good sharding key. Note that most of the discussion will also […]

Q&A: Multi-threaded Replication in MySQL 5.6 and MySQL 5.7

My webinar “Multi-threaded Replication in MySQL 5.6 and 5.7″ on February 25 generated several excellent questions following the presentation (available here for playback along with the slides). I didn’t have time to answer many of the questions during the session and so in this post I answer all of them. Thanks to everyone who attended! Q: […]

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

What happens when your application cannot open yet another connection to MySQL

Have you ever experienced a situation where one moment you can connect to the MySQL database and the next moment  you cannot, only to be able to connect again a second later? As you may know one cannot open infinite connections with MySQL. There’s a practical limit and more often than not it is imposed […]

Tips from the trenches for over-extended MySQL DBAs

This post is a follow-up to my November 19 webinar, “Tips from the Trenches: A Guide to Preventing Downtime for the Over-Extended DBA,” during which I described some of the most common reasons DBAs experience avoidable downtime. The session was aimed at the “over-stretched DBA,” identified as the MySQL DBA short of time or an […]

MySQL benchmarking: Know your baseline variance!

Often enough I find MySQL benchmark results where the difference between results is 1% or even less and some conclusions are drawn. Now it is not that 1% is not important – especially when you’re developing the product you should care about those 1% improvements or regressions because they tend to add up. However with […]