Search Results - innodb recovery time

Improving InnoDB recovery time

Speed of InnoDB recovery is known and quite annoying problem. It was discussed many times, see:
http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=29847

http://dammit.lt/2008/10/26/innodb-crash-recovery/
This is problem when your InnoDB crashes, it may takes long time to start. Also it affects restoring from backup (both LVM and xtrabackup / innobackup)
In this is simple test, I do crash mysql during in-memory tpcc-mysql benchmark […]

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Prometheus 2 Times Series Storage Performance Analyses

cpu saturation and max core usage

Prometheus 2 time series database (TSDB) is an amazing piece of engineering, offering a dramatic improvement compared to “v2” storage in Prometheus 1 in terms of ingest performance, query performance and resource use efficiency. As we’ve been adopting Prometheus 2 in Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM), I had a chance to look into the […]

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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 39: a valuable time spent at rootconf.in

Colin Charles

Join Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.
rootconf.in 2018 just ended, and it was very enjoyable to be in Bangalore for the conference. The audience was large, the conversations were great, and overall I think this is a rather important conference if you’re […]

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Enabling InnoDB Tablespace Encryption on Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7

InnoDB Tablespace Encryption

Security is one of the hottest topics lately, and in this blog post, I will walk you through what needs to be configured to have a working three-node Percona XtraDB Cluster running with InnoDB Tablespace Encryption enabled.
This article will not cover the basics of setting up a cluster nor will it cover how to […]

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MySQL Point in Time Recovery the Right Way

MySQL Point In Time Recovery

In this blog, I’ll look at how to do MySQL point in time recovery (PITR) correctly.
Sometimes we need to restore from a backup, and then replay the transactions that happened after the backup was taken. This is a common procedure in most disaster recovery plans, when for example you accidentally drop a table/database or run […]

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How to Choose the MySQL innodb_log_file_size

innodb_log_file_size

In this blog post, I’ll provide some guidance on how to choose the MySQL innodb_log_file_size.
Like many database management systems, MySQL uses logs to achieve data durability (when using the default InnoDB storage engine). This ensures that when a transaction is committed, data is not lost in the event of crash or power loss.
MySQL’s InnoDB […]

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What is innodb_autoinc_lock_mode and why should I care?

In this blog post, we’ll look at what innodb_autoinc_lock_mode is and how it works.
I was recently discussing innodb_autoinc_lock_mode with some colleagues to address issues at a company I was working with.
This variable defines the lock mode to use for generating auto-increment values. The permissible values are 0, 1 or 2 (for “traditional”, “consecutive” or “interleaved” […]

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Severe performance regression in MySQL 5.7 crash recovery

MySQL 5.7 Crash Recovery

In this post, we’ll discuss some insight I’ve gained regarding severe performance regression in MySQL 5.7 crash recovery.
Working on different InnoDB log file sizes in my previous post:
What is a big innodb_log_file_size?

I tried to understand how we can make InnoDB crash recovery faster, but found a rather surprising 5.7 crash recovery regression.
Basically, crash recovery in […]

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What is a big innodb_log_file_size?

big innodb_log_file_size

In this post, we’ll discuss what constitutes a big
innodb_log_file_size, and how it can affect performance.
In the comments for our post on Percona Server 5.7 performance improvements, someone asked why we use
innodb_log_file_size=10G with an indication that it might be too big?
In my previous post (https://www.percona.com/blog/2016/05/17/mysql-5-7-read-write-benchmarks/), the example used
innodb_log_file_size=15G. Is that too big? Let’s take […]

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