EmergencyEMERGENCY? Get 24/7 Help Now!

TokuMX vs. MongoDB : In-Memory Sysbench Performance

 | September 10, 2013 |  Posted In: Tokutek, TokuView

PREVIOUS POST
NEXT POST

In talking to existing MongoDB users and TokuMX evaluators, I’ve often heard that the performance of MongoDB is very good as long as your working data set fits in RAM. The story continues that if your working data set grows to be larger than the RAM on your server, the built-in sharding capabilities of MongoDB allow you to scale horizontally.

As my benchmarking presentation at Percona Live 2013 pointed out, I’m never one to accept something without at least running it once myself. I decided to run my Sysbench for MongoDB benchmark on an in-memory workload, meaning that all of the data fits easily within the server’s RAM. More information about Sysbench is covered in one of my former blogs. At a high level, there are 16 collections in a single database, each containing 1 million documents. A single Sysbench “transaction” consists of point queries, range queries, a non-indexed update, an indexed update, a deletion, and an insertion.

Benchmark Environment

  • Dell R710, (2) Xeon 5540, 48GB RAM, PERC 6/i (256MB, write-back), 8x10K SAS/RAID 0
  • Centos 5.8 (64-bit), XFS file system
  • MongoDB v2.4.6 and TokuMX v1.2.0

Benchmark Results

sysbench-in-memory-tps

At 64 client threads TokuMX is completing 1910.73 Sysbench transactions per second versus MongoDB’s 357.93, an increase of 433%.

How much faster can your MongoDB applications run on TokuMX? Visit the download page and give it a try.

PREVIOUS POST
NEXT POST

Leave a Reply

 
 

Percona’s widely read Percona Data Performance blog highlights our expertise in enterprise-class software, support, consulting and managed services solutions for both MySQL® and MongoDB® across traditional and cloud-based platforms. The decades of experience represented by our consultants is found daily in numerous and relevant blog posts.

Besides specific database help, the blog also provides notices on upcoming events and webinars.
Want to get weekly updates listing the latest blog posts? Subscribe to our blog now! Submit your email address below and we’ll send you an update every Friday at 1pm ET.

No, thank you. Please do not ask me again.