Buy Percona ServicesBuy Now!
Subscribe to Latest MySQL Performance Blog posts feed
Updated: 2 hours 57 min ago

This Week In Data with Colin Charles 37: Percona Live 2018 Wrap Up

April 27, 2018 - 3:17pm

Join Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Percona Live Santa Clara 2018 is now over! All things considered, I think it went off quite well; if you have any comments/complaints/etc., please don’t hesitate to drop me a line. I believe a survey will be going out as to where you’d like to see the conference in 2019 – yes, it is no longer going to be at the Santa Clara Convention Centre.

I was pleasantly surprised that several people came up to me saying they read this column and enjoy it. Thank you!

The whole conference was abuzz with MySQL 8.0 GA chatter. Many seemed to enjoy the PostgreSQL focus too, now that Percona announced PostgreSQL support.

Congratulations as well to the MySQL Community Awards 2018 winners.

Releases Link List Upcoming appearances Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week In Data with Colin Charles 37: Percona Live 2018 Wrap Up appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

MySQL 8.0 GA: Quality or Not?

April 27, 2018 - 12:36pm

What does Anton Ego – a fictional restaurant critic from the Pixar movie Ratatouille – have to do with MySQL 8.0 GA?

When it comes to being a software critic, a lot.

In many ways, the work of a software critic is easy. We risk very little and thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to read and write.

But what about those who give their many hours of code development, and those who have tested such code before release? How about the many people behind the scenes who brought together packaging, documentation, multiple hours of design, marketing, online resources and more?

And all of that, I might add, is open source! Free for the world to take, copy, adapt and even incorporate in full or in part into their own open development.

It is in exactly that area that the team at MySQL shines once again – they have from their humble beginnings build up a colossally powerful database software that handles much of the world’s data, fast.

Used in every area of life – aerospace, defense, education, finances, government, healthcare, pharma, manufacturing, media, retail, telecoms, hospitality, and finally the web – it truly is a community effort.

My little contribution to this effort is first and foremost to say: well done! Well done for such an all-in-all huge endeavor. When I tested MySQL 8.0, I experienced something new: an extraordinarily clean bug report screen when I unleashed our bug hunting rats, ahem, I mean tools. This was somewhat unexpected. Usually, new releases are a fun playground even for seasoned QA engineers who look for the latest toy to break.

I have a suspicion that the team at Oracle either uses newly-improved bug-finding tools or perhaps they included some of our methods and tools in their setup. In either case, it is, was and will be welcome.

When the unexpected occurs, a fight or flight syndrome happens. I tend to be a fighter, so I upped the battle and managed to find about 30 bugs, with 21 bugs logged already. Quite a few of them are Sig 11’s in release builds. Signal 11 exceptions are unexpected crashes, and release builds are the exact same build you would download at dev.mysql.com.

The debug build also had a number of issues, but less than expected, leading me to the conclusions drawn above. Since Oracle engineers marked many of the issues logged as security bugs, I didn’t list them here. I’ll give Oracle some time to fix them, but I might add them later.

In summary, my personal recommendation is this: unless you are a funky new web company thriving on the latest technology, give Oracle the opportunity to make a few small point bugfix releases before adapting MySQL 8.0 GA. After that, providing upgrade prerequisites are matched, and that your software application is compatible, go for it and upgrade.

Before that, this is a great time to start checking out the latest and greatest that MySQL 8.0 GA has to offer!

All in all, I like what I saw, and I expect MySQL 8.0 GA to have a bright future.

Signed, a seasoned software critic.

The post MySQL 8.0 GA: Quality or Not? appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

The Evolution of the DBA in an “As-A-Service” World

April 26, 2018 - 12:15pm

The requirements for managing and running a database in a modern enterprise have evolved over the past ten years. Those in charge of running enterprise databases have seen their focus shift from ensuring access and availability, to architecture, design and scalability responsibilities. Web-first companies pioneered the change by charging site reliability engineers (SRE’s) or multi-faceted DBAs with the task of ensuring that the company’s main revenue engine not only stayed up, but could scale to wherever the business needed to go. This is a far cry from the classic enterprise DBA’s top responsibilities: keep it up, keep it backed up, and react to issues as they present themselves.

Today, enterprises look for new revenue models to keep up with a shifting technology paradigm driven by the cloud. The requirements and needs for managing their database environments are changing along with this shift. In the SaaS world, application outages mean lost revenue. Worse, it leads to customer churn and gives your competitors an opening. To keep revenue flowing, every part of a SaaS company’s critical infrastructure needs to be planned out: redundancy should be built-in, and a future-proof architecture should be built to accommodate scale.

The more issues you can design out before launch, the less chance of a catastrophic outage later on. This means as a SaaS provider you want your DBAs and database engineers architecting a database that avoids problems at scale, and you want them working with your developers to write better, more efficient database calls. The database infrastructure is designed and automated to work at scale, while taking into account efficient use of resources for meeting today’s requirements.

When companies move to the cloud, the cloud provider takes care of much of the operational automation and many of the mundane day-to-day tasks (for example, using database as a service (DBaaS) options such as Amazon RDS and Aurora). But this does not eliminate the need for database expertise: it moves the function closer to the design and development side of the application. Someone needs to not only design and tune the database to support the application, but also has to understand how to build the modular pieces available in the cloud into a cohesive scalable unit that meets the needs of the application and the company. This means there are much higher impacts and clearer ROIs realized from efficient database expertise.

 

Over the years at Percona, we have seen this shift as well. Currently, more than 50% of the support tickets our customers open are related to application design issues, query performance or database infrastructure design. This is a far cry from five years ago when these represented less than 20% of our overall caseload. This makes sense, however, when you think about the maturity of our database products and the technological advances that impact the database. A more stable MySQL and MongoDB, coupled with advances in either homegrown automation or cloud-based infrastructure, reduce the likelihood of common crashing bugs and “Core Database Software” related bugs. Instead, outages and issues are increasingly caused by design decisions, bad code or unplanned-for edge cases. In order to keep up, DBAs need to evolve to move upstream to have the greatest impact.

At Percona, we recognize the changing requirements of modern database deployments. In fact, we have been providing database expertise since the beginning of the SaaS and cloud era. We recognize the needs of clients that choose to run on a DBaaS platform are slightly different than those managing their own full-stack database deployments.

That’s why we created a brand new tier of support focused on DBaaS platforms. These services allow you to rely on your cloud provider for operational break-fix support, while augmenting that with proven world-class expertise focused on the design, development, and tuning of the database itself (which cloud providers typically don’t address).

We also launched a DBaaS-focused version of our Percona DBA service. The Percona DBA service focuses on designing, setting up, and proactively improving your DBaaS cloud environment to ensure you get the most out of your investment. 

Contact us for more details on our new support and managed service options that can help optimize your cloud database environments, and make them run as efficiently as possible with the applications that drive your business.

The post The Evolution of the DBA in an “As-A-Service” World appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

MySQL Community Awards Winners 2018

April 25, 2018 - 9:45pm

One of the highlights of Percona Live is that the winners of the annual MySQL Community Awards are announced. A 100% community effort, the awards were created to recognize community contribution. This year saw six very deserving winners in three categories:

MySQL Community Awards: Community Contributor of the year 2018

Two individuals received these awards:

  • Jean-François Gagné
    Jean-François was nominated for his many blog posts, bug reports, and experiment results that make MySQL much better. His blog: https://jfg-mysql.blogspot.com/
  • Sveta Smirnova
    Sveta spreads knowledge and good practice on all things MySQL as a frequent speaker and blogger. Her years of experience in testing, support, and consulting are shared in webinars, technical posts, conferences around the world and in her book “MySQL Troubleshooting”. While we’re proud to say that Sveta works for Percona, this reward is for her outstanding individual contribution irrespective of that. Kudos and respect, Sveta!
MySQL Community Awards: Application of the year 2018

Three applications were honoured:

  • MyRocks
    MyRocks is now in MariaDB, Percona Server and PolarDB (Alibaba). Intel, MariaDB and Rockset are optimizing it for cloud native storage.
  • ProxySQL
    ProxySQL solves serious, real-world problems experienced by DBAs in an elegant way.
  • Vitess
    Vitess is a database clustering system for horizontal scaling of MySQL. Originally developed at YouTube/Google and now under CNCF, Vitess is free and open source and aims to solve scaling problems for MySQL installations.
MySQL Community Awards: Corporate Contributor of the year 2018

The awards were presented by Agustín Gallego and Emily Slocombe.

In the spirit of open source, much of the content of this post has been sourced from the MySQL Community Awards website and the full information can be read there. Please do take the time to read the full details and you can also read about past winners and initiatives on that site.

Congratulations to all!

The post MySQL Community Awards Winners 2018 appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Visit Percona Store


General Inquiries

For general inquiries, please send us your question and someone will contact you.