October 24, 2014

How to scale big data applications using MySQL sharding frameworks

This Wednesday I’ll be discussing two common types of big data: machine-generated data and user-generated content. These types of big data are amenable to sharding, a commonly used technique for spreading data over more than one database server. I’ll be discussing this in-depth during a live webinar at 10 a.m. Pacific time on Sept. 24. […]

Q&A: Putting MySQL Fabric to use

Martin Arrieta and I gave an online presentation last week on “Putting MySQL Fabric To Use.” If you missed it, you can find a recording and the slides here, and the vagrant environment we used plus a transcript of the commands we ran here (be sure to check out the ‘sharding’ branch, as that’s what we used […]

Putting MySQL Fabric to Use: July 30 webinar

Martin and I have recently been blogging together about MySQL Fabric (in case you’ve missed this, you can find the first post of the series here), and on July 30th, we’re going to be presenting a webinar on this topic titled “Putting MySQL Fabric to Use.” The focus of the webinar is to help you get […]

Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

Managing farms of MySQL servers with MySQL Fabric

While built-in replication has been a major cause for MySQL’s wide adoption, official tools to help DBAs manage replication topologies have typically been missing from the picture. The community has produced many good products to fill in this gap, but recently, Oracle has been filling it too with the addition of MySQL Utilities to the mix. One […]

Oracle’s Mats Kindahl to weave MySQL Fabric into Percona Live session

MySQL Fabric is an integrated framework for managing farms of MySQL servers with support for both high-availability and sharding. Its development has been spearheaded by Mats Kindahl, senior principal software developer in MySQL at Oracle. Mats is leading the MySQL Scaling and High-Availability effort covering the newly released MySQL Fabric and the MySQL Applier for […]

Shard-Query adds parallelism to queries

Preamble: On performance, workload and scalability: MySQL has always been focused on OLTP workloads. In fact, both Percona Server and MySQL 5.5.7rc have numerous performance improvements which benefit workloads that have high concurrency. Typical OLTP workloads feature numerous clients (perhaps hundreds or thousands) each reading and writing small chunks of data. The recent improvements to […]

“Shard early, shard often”

I wrote a post a while back that said why you don’t want to shard.  In that post that I tried to explain that hardware advances such as 128G of RAM being so cheap is changing the point at which you need to shard, and that the (often omitted) operational issues created by sharding can […]

How to generate per-database traffic statistics using mk-query-digest

We often encounter customers who have partitioned their applications among a number of databases within the same instance of MySQL (think application service providers who have a separate database per customer organization … or wordpress-mu type of apps). For example, take the following single MySQL instance with multiple (identical) databases:

Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons