September 19, 2014

Conflict Avoidance with auto_increment_increment and auto_increment_offset

A lot of people are running MySQL Master-Master replication pairs in Active-Passive mode for purpose of high availabilities using MMM or other solutions. Such solutions generally have one major problem – you have to be very carefully switching writes as if you do not do it atomically (such as some scripts continue to write to […]

MySQL Limitations Part 2: The Binary Log

This is the second in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in certain circumstances (links: part 1). In the first part, I wrote about single-threaded replication. Upstream from the replicas is the primary, which enables replication by writing a so-called “binary log” of events that modify data in the server. The binary log is […]

MySQL Limitations Part 1: Single-Threaded Replication

I recently mentioned a few of the big “non-starter” limitations Postgres has overcome for specific use cases. I decided to write a series of blog posts on MySQL’s unsolved severe limitations. I mean limitations that really hobble it for major, important needs — not in areas where it isn’t used, but in areas where it […]

Replication of MEMORY (HEAP) Tables

Some Applications need to store some transient data which is frequently regenerated and MEMORY table look like a very good match for this sort of tasks. Unfortunately this will bite when you will be looking to add Replication to your environment as MEMORY tables do not play well with replication.

The story of one MySQL Upgrade

I recently worked on upgrading MySQL from one of very early MySQL 5.0 versions to Percona Server 5.1. This was a classical upgrade scenario which can cause surprises. Master and few slaves need to be upgraded. It is a shared database used by tons of applications written by many people over more than 5 years […]

Why you can’t rely on a replica for disaster recovery

A couple of weeks ago one of my colleagues and I worked on a data corruption case that reminded me that sometimes people make unsafe assumptions without knowing it. This one involved SAN snapshotting that was unsafe. In a nutshell, the client used SAN block-level replication to maintain a standby/failover MySQL system, and there was […]

Storing MySQL Binary logs on NFS Volume

There is a lot of discussions whenever running MySQL storing data on NFS is a good idea. There is a lot of things for and against this and this post is not about them. The fact is number of people run their databases on NetApp and other forms of NFS storage and this post is […]

Estimating Replication Capacity

It is easy for MySQL replication to become bottleneck when Master server is not seriously loaded and the more cores and hard drives the get the larger the difference becomes, as long as replication remains single thread process. At the same time it is a lot easier to optimize your system when your replication runs […]

Debugging problems with row based replication

MySQL 5.1 introduces row based binary logging. In fact, the default binary logging format in GA versions of MySQL 5.1 is ‘MIXED’ STATEMENT*;   The binlog_format  variable can still be changed per sessions which means it is possible that some of your binary log entries will be written in a row-based fashion instead of the […]

How to know if you’re updating Slave you should not ?

When replication runs out of sync first question you often ask is if someone could be writing to the slave. Of course there is read_only setting which is good to set in the slave but it is not set always and also users with SUPER privilege bypass it. Looking into binary log is obvious choice […]