September 30, 2014

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]

ScaleArc: Real-world application testing with WordPress (benchmark test)

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by me and ScaleArc co-founder and chief architect, Uday Sawant. The goal of this benchmark was to identify ScaleArc’s overhead using a real-world application – the world’s most popular (according to […]

Understanding the maximum number of columns in a MySQL table

This post was initially going to be two sets of polls: “What is the maximum number of columns in MySQL?” and “What is the minimum maximum number of columns in MySQL?”. Before you read on, ponder those questions and come up with your own answers… and see if you’re right or can prove me wrong! […]

Secure passwords being insecure

If you follow the general advices to create secure password the following ones seem to be secure, right? s11P$||!sh&2 pr0&!!ke0 3kj39|!381 The answer to the question is, “it depends on how you use them” Notice that these passwords all contain multiple exclamation points and ampersands which are normally special characters for your shell. The people […]

Using sysbench 0.5 for performing MySQL benchmarks

Given the recent excitement & interest around OpenStack I wanted to make sure I was ready to conduct appropriate evaluations of system performance.  I generally turn to sysbench since it comes with a variety of different tests (accessed via –test= option interface), including: fileio – File I/O test cpu – CPU performance test memory – […]

mysqld_multi: How to run multiple instances of MySQL

The need to have multiple instances of MySQL (the well-known mysqld process) running in the same server concurrently in a transparent way, instead of having them executed in separate containers/virtual machines, is not very common. Yet from time to time the Percona Support team receives a request from a customer to assist in the configuration of […]

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his […]

Measuring failover time for ScaleArc load balancer

ScaleArc hired Percona to benchmark failover times for the ScaleArc database traffic management software in different scenarios. We tested failover times for various clustered setups, where ScaleArc itself was the load balancer for the cluster. These tests complement other performance tests on the ScaleArc software – sysbench testing for latency and testing for WordPress acceleration. […]

Percona Server 5.1.73-14.12 is now available

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.1.73-14.12 on July 31st, 2014 (Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories). Based on MySQL 5.1.73, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.1.73-14.12 is now the current stable release in the 5.1 series. All of Percona‘s software is open-source and free, all the details of the release […]