November 21, 2014

Reference architecture for a write-intensive MySQL deployment

We designed Percona Cloud Tools (both hardware and software setup) to handle a very high-intensive MySQL write workload. For example, we already observe inserts of 1bln+ datapoints per day. So I wanted to share what kind of hardware we use to achieve this result. Let me describe what we use, and later I will explain […]

Q&A: Even More Deadly Mistakes of MySQL Development

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Even More Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars.  If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions.  I answered as many as we had […]

TIMESTAMP Columns, Amazon RDS 5.6, and You

This comes from an issue that I worked on recently, wherein a customer reported that their application was working fine under stock MySQL 5.6 but producing erroneous results when they tried running it on Amazon RDS 5.6. They had a table which, on the working server, contained two TIMESTAMP columns, one which defaulted to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP […]

How to avoid even more of the common (but deadly) MySQL development mistakes

On July 16 I’ll be presenting my next webinar focusing on common mistakes committed by MySQL users. How to Avoid Even More of the Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes “Why can’t I just save my data to a file?” Using an SQL database seems so complex to get right, and for good reason. The […]

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Measure the impact of MySQL configuration changes with Percona Cloud Tools

When you make a change to your MySQL configuration in production it would be great to know the impact (a “before and after” type of picture). Some changes are obvious. For many variables proper values can be determined beforehand, i.e. innodb_buffer_pool_size or innodb_log_file_size. However, there is 1 configuration variable which is much less obvious for many people […]

Using MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema in multi-tenant environments

Hosting a shared MySQL instance for your internal or external clients (“multi-tenant”) was always a challenge. Multi-tenants approach or a “schema-per-customer” approach is pretty common nowadays to host multiple clients on the same MySQL sever. One of issues of this approach, however, is the lack of visibility: it is hard to tell how many resources (queries, disk, […]

How MySQL ‘queries’ and ‘questions’ are measured

MySQL has status variables “questions” and “queries” which are rather close but also a bit different, making it confusing for many people. The manual describing it might not be very easy to understand:

In a nutshell if you’re not using prepared statements the big difference between those is what “Questions” would count stored procedure calls as […]

Benchmark: SimpleHTTPServer vs pyclustercheck (twisted implementation)

Github user Adrianlzt provided a python-twisted alternative version of pyclustercheck per discussion on issue 7. Due to sporadic performance issues noted with the original implementation in SimpleHTTPserver, the benchmarks which I’ve included as part of the project on github use mutli-mechanize library, cache time 1 sec 2 x 100 thread pools 60s ramp up time 600s […]

Exploring message brokers

Message brokers are not regularly covered here but are, nonetheless, important web-related technologies. Some time ago, I was asked by one of our customer to review a selection of OSS message brokers and propose a couple of good candidates. The requirements were fairly simple: behave well when there’s a large backlog of messages, be able […]