October 22, 2014

Why don’t our new Nagios plugins use caching?

In response to the release of our new MySQL monitoring plugins on Friday, one commenter asked why the new Nagios plugins don’t use caching. It’s worth answering in a post rather than a comment, because there is an important principle that needs to be understood to monitor servers correctly. But first, some history. When I […]

MySQL Life Cycle. Your Feedback is needed.

When I started with MySQL 3.22 I would start running MySQL from early beta (if not alpha) and update MySQL the same date as release would hit the web. Since that time I matured and so did MySQL ecosystem. MySQL is powering a lot more demanding and business critical applications now than 12 years ago […]

What’s required to tune MySQL?

I got a serendipitous call (thanks!) yesterday asking what would be needed to tune[1] a database for better performance. It is a question that I hear often, but I never thought about answering it in public. Here’s a consolidated version of what I explained during our conversation.

Is VoltDB really as scalable as they claim?

Before I begin, a disclaimer. VoltDB is not a customer, and did not pay Percona or me to investigate VoltDB’s scalability or publish this blog post. More disclaimers at the end. Short version: VoltDB is very scalable; it should scale to 120 partitions, 39 servers, and 1.6 million complex transactions per second at over 300 […]

MySQL 5.5.8 – in search of stability

A couple of days ago, Dimitri published a blog post, Analyzing Percona’s TPCC-like Workload on MySQL 5.5, which was  a response to my post, MySQL 5.5.8 and Percona Server: being adaptive. I will refer to Dimitri’s article as article [1]. As always, Dimitri has provided a very detailed and thoughtful article, and I strongly recommend reading if […]

table_cache negative scalability

Couple of months ago there was a post by FreshBooks on getting great performance improvements by lowering table_cache variable. So I decided to investigate what is really happening here. The “common sense” approach to tuning caches is to get them as large as you can if you have enough resources (such as memory). With MySQL […]

Tokyo Tyrant – The Extras Part I : Is it Durable?

You know how in addition to the main movie you have extras on the DVD.  Extra commentary, bloopers, extra scenes, etc? Well welcome the Tyrant extras.  With my previous blog posts I was trying to set-up a case for looking at NOSQL tools, and not meant to be a decision making tool.  Each solution has […]

Innodb performance gotcha w Larger queries.

Couple of days ago I was looking for a way to improve update performance for the application and I was replacing single value UPDATE with multiple value REPLACE (though I also saw the same problem with INSERT ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE) As I went from 1 value to 3 or 10 in the batch performance […]

HighLoad 2007 Review

Almost two weeks have passed since HighLoad 2007 conference in Moscow, Russia so I’m pretty late with feedback and my only excuse I was pretty busy to spare some time for it. Lets start with bright side. The conference had a lot of great sessions by experts in their field. A lot of top Russian […]

How simple answer are you looking for ?

I’ve got an interesting comment the other day saying “I’ve heard Jay Pipes saying indexes with cardinality lower than 30% are worthless, true?” That is interesting question and it has different answers depending on who is asking. A lot of people want to hear simple answers to the questions because they would be overwhelmed by […]