Search Results for: systems design blog

How small changes impact complex systems – MySQL example

If you’ve been studying complex systems you know what minor changes might cause consequences of much greater proportions, sometimes causing some effects that are not easily explained at first. I recently ran across a great illustration of such behavior while doing MySQL benchmarks which I thought would be interesting to share. I’m using a very […]

What stopped MySQL? Tracing back signals sent to MySQL

Have you ever had a case where you needed to find a process which sent a HUP/KILL/TERM or other signal to your database? Let me rephrase. Did you ever have to find which process messed up your night? 😉 If so, you might want to read on. I’m going to tell you how you can […]

InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]

Facebook MySQL database engineers ready for Percona Live London 2014

With 1.28 billion active users, Facebook MySQL database engineers are active and extremely valuable contributors to the global MySQL community. So naturally they are also active participants of Percona Live MySQL conferences! And next week’s Percona Live London 2014 (Nov. 3-4) is no exception. (Register now and use the promotional code “Facebook” to save £30!) […]

Innodb transaction history often hides dangerous ‘debt’

In many write-intensive workloads Innodb/XtraDB storage engines you may see hidden and dangerous “debt” being accumulated – unpurged transaction “history” which if not kept in check over time will cause serve performance regression or will take all free space and cause an outage. Let’s talk about where it comes from and what can you do […]

Reference architecture for a write-intensive MySQL deployment

We designed Percona Cloud Tools (both hardware and software setup) to handle a very high-intensive MySQL write workload. For example, we already observe inserts of 1bln+ datapoints per day. So I wanted to share what kind of hardware we use to achieve this result. Let me describe what we use, and later I will explain […]

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.4 release

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.4. Changelog: * Added login-path support to Nagios plugins with MySQL client 5.6 (bug 1338549) * Added a new threshold option for delayed slaves to pmp-check-mysql-replication-delay (bug 1318280) * Added delayed slave support to pmp-check-mysql-replication-running (bug 1332082) * Updated Nagios plugins and Cacti script […]