September 16, 2014

Recovering from a bad UPDATE statement

Did you just run an UPDATE against your 10 million row users table without a WHERE clause?  Did you know that in MySQL 5.5 that sometimes you can recover from a bad UPDATE statement?  This is possible if you are running in binlog_format=ROW ! Imagine this scenario:

We run an accidental UPDATE statement that […]

Percona’s Commitments to MySQL Users

You probably saw the Twitter storm over Oracle’s pricing changes and InnoDB in the last few days. The fear about Oracle removing InnoDB from the free version of MySQL was baseless — it was just a misunderstanding. Still, in the years since MySQL has been acquired by Sun, and then by Oracle, many MySQL users […]

Can MySQL temporary tables be made safe for statement-based replication?

A while ago I wrote about how to make MySQL replication reliable, part of which is to eliminate temporary tables. The idea is this: if a slave is stopped (or crashed) while a temporary table is open and is then restarted, the temporary table doesn’t exist anymore, and the slave will have problems trying to […]

State of MySQL Market and will Replication live ?

There are interesting posts these day about future of MySQL Replication by Brian Frank and Arjen. I think it very interesting to take a look at a bit bigger picture using framework from Innovators Dilemma and Innovators Solution. I’m not going to speak about disruption and commoditisation of Database Market, leaving this for Market talks, […]

Galera replication – how to recover a PXC cluster

Galera replication for MySQL brings not only the new, great features to our ecosystem, but also introduces completely new maintenance techniques. Are you concerned about adding such new complexity to your MySQL environment? Perhaps that concern is unnecessarily. I am going to present here some simple tips that hopefully will let fresh Galera users prevent […]

Trawling the binlog with FlexCDC and new FlexCDC plugins for MySQL

Swanhart-Tools includes FlexCDC, a change data capture tool for MySQL. FlexCDC follows a server’s binary log and usually writes “changelogs” that track the changes to tables in the database. I say usually because the latest version of Swanhart-Tools (only in github for now) supports FlexCDC plugins, which allow you to send the updates to a remote […]

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his […]

What I learned while migrating a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS

Hi, I recently had the experience of assisting with a migration of a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS (Relational Database Service). Amazon RDS is a great platform for hosting your MySQL installation and offers the following list of pros and cons: You can scale your CPU, IOPS, and storage space separately by using Amazon […]

Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]