September 3, 2014

How to identify and cure MySQL replication slave lag

Here on the Percona MySQL Support team, we often see issues where a customer is complaining about replication delays – and many times the problem ends up being tied to MySQL replication slave lag. This of course is nothing new for MySQL users and we’ve had a few posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog […]

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ‘ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

Disconnecting a replication slave is easier with MySQL 5.5+ (RESET SLAVE vs. RESET SLAVE ALL)

It’s not uncommon to promote a server from slave to master. One of the key things to protect your data integrity is to make sure that the promoted slave is permanently disconnected from its old master. If not, it may get writes from the old master, which can cause all kinds of data corruption. MySQL […]

How to lag a slave behind to avoid a disaster

MySQL Replication is useful and easy to setup. It is used for very different purposes. For example: split read and writes run data mining or reporting processes on them disaster recovery Is important to mention that a replication server is not a backup by itself. A mistake on the master, for example a DROP DATABASE […]

How SHOW SLAVE STATUS relates to CHANGE MASTER TO

As you probably know MySQL Replication (statement based) works by fetching statements from MASTERs binary log and executing them on the SLAVE. Since MySQL 4.0 this process is a bit more involved having events passing via relay logs on the Slave which also means there are two replication threads “IO Thread” and “SQL Thread” used […]

MariaDB: Selective binary logs events

In the first post in a series on MariaDB features we find interesting, we begin with selectively skipping replication of binlog events. This feature is available on MariaDB 5.5 and 10. By default when using MySQL’s standard replication, all events are logged in the binary log and those binary log events are replicated to all slaves […]

Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

max_allowed_packet and binary log corruption in MySQL

The combination of max_allowed_packet variable and replication in MySQL is a common source of headaches. In a nutshell, max_allowed_packet is the maximum size of a MySQL network protocol packet that the server can create or read. It has a default value of 1MB (<= 5.6.5) or 4MB (>= 5.6.6) and a maximum size of 1GB. […]

GTIDs in MySQL 5.6: New replication protocol; new ways to break replication

One of the MySQL 5.6 features many people are interested in is Global Transactions IDs (GTIDs). This is for a good reason: Reconnecting a slave to a new master has always been a challenge while it is so trivial when GTIDs are enabled. However, using GTIDs is not only about replacing good old binlog file/position […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]