October 1, 2014

MySQL Limitations Part 1: Single-Threaded Replication

I recently mentioned a few of the big “non-starter” limitations Postgres has overcome for specific use cases. I decided to write a series of blog posts on MySQL’s unsolved severe limitations. I mean limitations that really hobble it for major, important needs — not in areas where it isn’t used, but in areas where it […]

MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection to the server.

MySQL Limitations Part 3: Subqueries

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in certain circumstances (links: part 1, 2). This post is about subqueries, which in some cases execute outside-in instead of inside-out as users expect.

MySQL Limitations Part 2: The Binary Log

This is the second in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in certain circumstances (links: part 1). In the first part, I wrote about single-threaded replication. Upstream from the replicas is the primary, which enables replication by writing a so-called “binary log” of events that modify data in the server. The binary log is […]

Q&A: Putting MySQL Fabric to use

Martin Arrieta and I gave an online presentation last week on “Putting MySQL Fabric To Use.” If you missed it, you can find a recording and the slides here, and the vagrant environment we used plus a transcript of the commands we ran here (be sure to check out the ‘sharding’ branch, as that’s what we used […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]

MySQL 5.6 New Replication Features: Webinar followup Q&A

I want to thank all attendees of my webinar, “MySQL 5.6 New Replication Features: Benefits, Challenges and Limitations“. We had questions that I didn’t have the time to answer: Q: If I run on Amazon’s RDS, do I need to worry about enabling crash-safe slaves, or is that already in place? A: Crash-safe replication is […]

More on MySQL transaction descriptors optimization

Since my first post on MySQL transaction descriptors optimization introduced in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2 and a followup by Dimitri Kravchuk, we have received a large number of questions on why the benchmark results in both posts look rather different. We were curious as well, so we tried to answer that question by retrying benchmarks on […]

trx descriptors: MySQL performance improvements in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2

One major problem in terms of MySQL performance that still stands in the way of InnoDB scalability is the trx_list scan on consistent read view creation. It was originally reported as a part of MySQL bug #49169 and can be described as follows. Whenever a connection wants to create a consistent read, it has to […]

How does MySQL Replication really work?

While we do have many blog posts on replication on our blog, such as on replication being single-threaded, on semi-synchronous replication or on estimating replication capacity, I don’t think we have one that covers the very basics of how MySQL replication really works on the high level. Or it’s been so long ago I can’t […]