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SHOW INNODB STATUS walk through

Many people asked me to publish a walk through SHOW INNODB STATUS output, showing what you can learn from SHOW INNODB STATUS output and how to use this info to improve MySQL Performance. To start with basics SHOW INNODB STATUS is command which prints out a lot of internal Innodb performance counters, statistics, information about […]

5 free handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication

MySQL Replication is very simple to set up. In this post I’ll discuss its importance and five handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication. What is MySQL Replication? It’s the process of copying the (real-time events) data from one master instance to another slave instance and maintaining the redundant consistent data in a different […]

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug. First […]

Getting mutex information from MySQL’s performance_schema

We have been using SHOW ENGINE INNODB MUTEX command for years. It shows us mutex and rw-lock information that could be useful during service troubleshooting in case of performance problems. As Morgan Tocker announced in his blog post the command will be removed from MySQL 5.7 and we have to use performance_schema to get that […]

Using YUM to install specific MySQL/Percona Server versions

Sometimes it is desired to use particular software versions in production, and not necessary the latest ones. There may be several reasons for that, where I think the most common is when a new version should spend some time in testing or a staging environment before getting to production. In theory each new version is […]

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

Tips from the trenches for over-extended MySQL DBAs

This post is a follow-up to my November 19 webinar, “Tips from the Trenches: A Guide to Preventing Downtime for the Over-Extended DBA,” during which I described some of the most common reasons DBAs experience avoidable downtime. The session was aimed at the “over-stretched DBA,” identified as the MySQL DBA short of time or an […]

Optimizing MySQL for Zabbix

This blog post was inspired by my visit at the annual Zabbix Conference in Riga, Latvia this year, where I gave a couple of talks on MySQL and beyond. It was a two day single-track event with some 200 participants, a number of interesting talks on Zabbix (and related technologies) and really well-organized evening activities. […]

How to deal with MySQL deadlocks

A deadlock in MySQL happens when two or more transactions mutually hold and request for locks, creating a cycle of dependencies. In a transaction system, deadlocks are a fact of life and not completely avoidable. InnoDB automatically detects transaction deadlocks, rollbacks a transaction immediately and returns an error. It uses a metric to pick the […]