October 1, 2014

MySQL 101: Monitor Disk I/O with pt-diskstats

Here on the Percona Support team we often ask customers to retrieve disk stats to monitor disk IO and to measure block devices iops and latency. There are a number of tools available to monitor IO on Linux. iostat is one of the popular tools and Percona Toolkit, which is free, contains the pt-diskstats tool […]

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Using MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema in multi-tenant environments

Hosting a shared MySQL instance for your internal or external clients (“multi-tenant”) was always a challenge. Multi-tenants approach or a “schema-per-customer” approach is pretty common nowadays to host multiple clients on the same MySQL sever. One of issues of this approach, however, is the lack of visibility: it is hard to tell how many resources (queries, disk, […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]

How MySQL ‘queries’ and ‘questions’ are measured

MySQL has status variables “questions” and “queries” which are rather close but also a bit different, making it confusing for many people. The manual describing it might not be very easy to understand:

In a nutshell if you’re not using prepared statements the big difference between those is what “Questions” would count stored procedure calls as […]

A technical WebScaleSQL review and comparison with Percona Server

The recent WebScaleSQL announcement has made quite a splash in the MySQL community over the last few weeks, and with a good reason. The collaboration between the major MySQL-at-scale users to develop a single code branch that addresses the needs of, well, web scale, is going to benefit the whole community. But I feel that […]

OOM relation to vm.swappiness=0 in new kernel

I have recently been involved in diagnosing the reasons behind OOM invocation that would kill the MySQL server process. Of course these servers were primarily running MySQL. As such the MySQL server process was the one with the largest amount of memory allocated. But the strange thing was that in all the cases, there was […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

Many-table joins in MySQL 5.6

I recently worked on an uncommon slow query: less than 100 rows were read and returned, the whole dataset was fitting in memory but the query took several seconds to run. Long story short: the query was a join involving 21 tables, running on MySQL 5.1. But by default MySQL 5.1 is not good at […]

PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about. First, I would say main […]