September 1, 2014

Advanced index analysis with mk-index-usage

The new release of Maatkit has a useful feature in mk-index-usage to help you determine how indexes are used in more flexible ways. The default report just prints out ALTER statements for removing unused indexes, which is nice, but it’s often helpful to ask more sophisticated questions about index usage. I’ll use this blog’s queries […]

Table locks in SHOW INNODB STATUS

Quite frequently I see people confused what table locks reported by SHOW INNODB STATUS really mean. Check this out for example:

This output gives us an impression Innodb has taken table lock on test/t1 table and many people tend to think Innodb in fact in some circumstances would abandon its row level locking and […]

InnoDB TABLE/INDEX stats

In Released and new coming features I did not mentioned two additional INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables available in XtraDB: It is INNODB_TABLE_STATS INNODB_INDEX_STATS These table show statistics about InnoDB tables ( taken from InnoDB data dictionary). INNODB_TABLE_STATS is | table_name | table name in InnoDB internal style (‘database/table’) | | rows | estimated number of all rows […]

How (not) to find unused indexes

I’ve seen a few people link to an INFORMATION_SCHEMA query to be able to find any indexes that have low cardinality, in an effort to find out what indexes should be removed.  This method is flawed – here’s the first reason why:

The cardinality of status index is woeful, but provided that the application […]

Why InnoDB index cardinality varies strangely

This is a very old draft, from early 2007 in fact. At that time I started to look into something interesting with the index cardinality statistics reported by InnoDB tables. The cardinality varies because it’s derived from estimates, and I know a decent amount about that. The interesting thing I wanted to look into was […]

Statistics of InnoDB tables and indexes available in xtrabackup

If you ever wondered how big is that or another index in InnoDB … you had to calculate it yourself by multiplying size of row (which I should add is harder in the case of a VARCHAR – since you need to estimate average length) on count of records. And it still would be quite […]

Multiple column index vs multiple indexes

(There is an updated version of the content in this post by Percona’s Stephane Combaudon available here.) After my previous post there were questions raised about Index Merge on Multiple Indexes vs Two Column Index efficiency. I mentioned in most cases when query can use both of the ways using multiple column index would be […]

Should you name indexes while doing ALTER TABLE ?

MySQL Server does not require you to specify name of the index if you’re running ALTER TABLE statement – it is optional. Though what might be good practical reasons to specify the key name or omit ? Things what you should be looking at is how MySQL names indexes automatically as well as what maintaining […]

Redundant index is not always bad

About year ago Peter wrote about redundant indexes and mentioned sometimes it is good to leave two indexes, even one is first part of another. I’m speaking about BTREE indexes, for example, KEY (A), and KEY (A,B). From SQL point of view KEY(A) is not needed, as for queries like WHERE A=5 the index (A,B) […]

SHOW INNODB STATUS walk through

Many people asked me to publish a walk through SHOW INNODB STATUS output, showing what you can learn from SHOW INNODB STATUS output and how to use this info to improve MySQL Performance. To start with basics SHOW INNODB STATUS is command which prints out a lot of internal Innodb performance counters, statistics, information about […]