Search Results for: show engine type

Using Percona Server 5.6 with the Docker open-source engine

There are a couple of posts about setting up Percona XtraDB Cluster on Vagrant and Percona Server on MySQL Sandbox – those are two of the top tools used by the Percona Support team for testing and bug processing among other things. In this post, however, I will show you how to use Docker with […]

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

The MySQL ARCHIVE storage engine – Alternatives

In my previous post I pointed out that the existing ARCHIVE storage engine in MySQL may not be the one that will satisfy your needs when it comes to effectively storing large and/or old data. But are there any good alternatives? As the primary purpose of this engine is to store rarely accessed data in disk […]

The ARCHIVE Storage Engine – does it do what you expect?

Sometimes there is a need for keeping large amounts of old, rarely used data without investing too much on expensive storage. Very often such data doesn’t need to be updated anymore, or the intent is to leave it untouched. I sometimes wonder what I should really suggest to our Support customers. For this purpose, the […]

Falcon Storage Engine Design Review

Now as new MySQL Storage engine – Falcon is public I can write down my thought about its design, which I previously should have kept private as I partially got them while working for MySQL. These thought base on my understanding, reading docs, speaking to Jim, Monty, Arjen and other people so I might miss […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

What happens when your application cannot open yet another connection to MySQL

Have you ever experienced a situation where one moment you can connect to the MySQL database and the next moment  you cannot, only to be able to connect again a second later? As you may know one cannot open infinite connections with MySQL. There’s a practical limit and more often than not it is imposed […]

Optimizing MySQL for Zabbix

This blog post was inspired by my visit at the annual Zabbix Conference in Riga, Latvia this year, where I gave a couple of talks on MySQL and beyond. It was a two day single-track event with some 200 participants, a number of interesting talks on Zabbix (and related technologies) and really well-organized evening activities. […]

Innodb transaction history often hides dangerous ‘debt’

In many write-intensive workloads Innodb/XtraDB storage engines you may see hidden and dangerous “debt” being accumulated – unpurged transaction “history” which if not kept in check over time will cause serve performance regression or will take all free space and cause an outage. Let’s talk about where it comes from and what can you do […]

MySQL compression: Compressed and Uncompressed data size

MySQL has information_schema.tables that contain information such as “data_length” or “avg_row_length.” Documentation on this table however is quite poor, making an assumption that those fields are self explanatory – they are not when it comes to tables that employ compression. And this is where inconsistency is born. Lets take a look at the same table […]