November 22, 2014

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 2

Part 1 of our series set-up our “test”  application and looked at boosting performance of the application by buffer MySQL with memcached.  Our test application is simple and requires only 3 basic operations per transaction 2 reads and 1 write.  Using memcached combined with MySQL we ended up nearly getting a 10X performance boost from […]

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 1

All to often people force themselves into using a database like MySQL with no thought into whether if its the best solution to there problem. Why?  Because their other applications use it, so why not the new application?  Over the past couple of months I have been doing a ton of work for clients who […]

SSD, XFS, LVM, fsync, write cache, barrier and lost transactions

We finally managed to get Intel X25-E SSD drive into our lab. I attached it to our Dell PowerEdge R900. The story making it running is worth separate mentioning – along with Intel X25-E I got HighPoint 2300 controller and CentOS 5.2 just could not start with two RAID controllers (Perc/6i and HighPoint 2300). The […]

SHOW OPEN TABLES – what is in your table cache

One command, which few people realize exists is SHOW OPEN TABLES – it allows you to examine what tables do you have open right now:

Using Multiple Key Caches for MyISAM Scalability

I have written before – MyISAM Does Not Scale, or it does quite well – two main things stopping you is table locks and global mutex on the KeyCache. Table Locks are not the issue for Read Only workload and write intensive workloads can be dealt with by using with many tables but Key Cache […]

JOIN Performance & Charsets

We have written before about the importance of using numeric types as keys, but maybe you’ve inherited a schema that you can’t change or have chosen string types as keys for a specific reason. Either way, the character sets used on joined columns can have a significant impact on the performance of your queries. Take […]

Missing Data – rows used to generate result set

As Baron writes it is not the number of rows returned by the query but number of rows accessed by the query will most likely be defining query performance. Of course not all row accessed are created equal (such as full table scan row accesses may be much faster than random index lookups row accesses […]

The MySQL optimizer, the OS cache, and sequential versus random I/O

In my post on estimating query completion time, I wrote about how I measured the performance on a join between a few tables in a typical star schema data warehousing scenario. In short, a query that could take several days to run with one join order takes an hour with another, and the optimizer chose […]

MySQL should have dynamic durability settings

If you’re using Innodb tables MySQL has innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit variable which defines how durable your transactions are. If you have high durability requirements you set it to 1 and log records are pushed directly to the disk on transaction commit. If you do not bother loosing come committed transactions you can set it to 0 and […]

Finding out largest tables on MySQL Server

Finding largest tables on MySQL instance is no brainier in MySQL 5.0+ thanks to Information Schema but I still wanted to post little query I use for the purpose so I can easily find it later, plus it is quite handy in a way it presents information: