Search Results for: session caching with mysql

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

The small improvements of MySQL 5.6: Duplicate Index Detection

Here at the MySQL Performance Blog, we’ve been discussing the several new features that MySQL 5.6 brought: GTID-based replication, InnoDB Fulltext, Memcached integration, a more complete performance schema, online DDL and several other InnoDB and query optimizer improvements. However, I plan to focus on a series of posts on the small but handy improvements – […]

Percona sessions at the MySQL conference

Many Percona employees will be at the 2010 MySQL conference. We’ll be giving a lot of informative technical talks on various topics. Here’s a list: Morgan Tocker, Baron Schwartz: Diagnosing and Fixing MySQL Performance Problems Peter Zaitsev: Scaling Applications with Caching, Sharding and Replication Baron Schwartz: EXPLAIN Demystified Vadim Tkachenko: An Overview of Flash Storage […]

New SpecJAppServer results at MySQL and Sun.

As you likely have seen Sun has posted the new SpecJAppServer Results More information from Tom Daly can be found here These results are quite interesting for me as I worked on some of the previous SpecJAppServer Benchmarks several years ago while being employed by MySQL. These are great results, plus they can be relevant […]