October 24, 2014

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ‘ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

Faster MySQL failover with SELECT mirroring

One of my favorite MySQL configurations for high availability is master-master replication, which is just like normal master-slave replication except that you can fail over in both directions. Aside from MySQL Cluster, which is more special-purpose, this is probably the best general-purpose way to get fast failover and a bunch of other benefits (non-blocking ALTER […]

A common problem when optimizing COUNT()

When optimizing queries for customers, the first thing I do with a slow query is figure out what it’s trying to do. You can’t fully optimize a query unless you know how to consider alternative ways to write it, and you can’t do that unless you know what the query “means.” I frequently run into […]

COUNT(*) vs COUNT(col)

Looking at how people are using COUNT(*) and COUNT(col) it looks like most of them think they are synonyms and just using what they happen to like, while there is substantial difference in performance and even query result. Lets look at the following series of examples:

Using delayed JOIN to optimize count(*) and LIMIT queries

In many Search/Browse applications you would see main (fact) table which contains search fields and dimension tables which contain more information about facts and which need to be joined to get query result. If you’re executing count(*) queries for such result sets MySQL will perform the join even if you use LEFT JOIN so it […]

COUNT(*) for Innodb Tables

I guess note number one about MyISAM to Innodb migration is warning what Innodb is very slow in COUNT(*) queries. The part which I often however see omitted is fact it only applies to COUNT(*) queries without WHERE clause. So if you have query like SELECT COUNT(*) FROM USER It will be much faster for […]

INSERT INTO … SELECT Performance with Innodb tables.

Everyone using Innodb tables probably got use to the fact Innodb tables perform non locking reads, meaning unless you use some modifiers such as LOCK IN SHARE MODE or FOR UPDATE, SELECT statements will not lock any rows while running. This is generally correct, however there a notable exception – INSERT INTO table1 SELECT * […]

Innodb transaction history often hides dangerous ‘debt’

In many write-intensive workloads Innodb/XtraDB storage engines you may see hidden and dangerous “debt” being accumulated – unpurged transaction “history” which if not kept in check over time will cause serve performance regression or will take all free space and cause an outage. Let’s talk about where it comes from and what can you do […]

Recover orphaned InnoDB partition tablespaces in MySQL

A few months back, Michael wrote about reconnecting orphaned *.ibd files using MySQL 5.6. I will show you the same procedure, this time for partitioned tables. An InnoDB partition is also a self-contained tablespace in itself so you can use the same method described in the previous post. To begin with, I have an example […]

How to avoid hash collisions when using MySQL’s CRC32 function

Percona Toolkit’s  pt-table-checksum performs an online replication consistency check by executing checksum queries on the master, which produces different results on replicas that are inconsistent with the master – and the tool pt-table-sync synchronizes data efficiently between MySQL tables. The tools by default use the CRC32. Other good choices include MD5 and SHA1. If you have installed the FNV_64 user-defined function, pt-table-sync will […]