September 22, 2014

Recovering Innodb table Corruption

Assume you’re running MySQL with Innodb tables and you’ve got crappy hardware, driver bug, kernel bug, unlucky power failure or some rare MySQL bug and some pages in Innodb tablespace got corrupted. In such cases Innodb will typically print something like this: InnoDB: Database page corruption on disk or a failed InnoDB: file read of […]

SELECT LOCK IN SHARE MODE and FOR UPDATE

Baron wrote nice article comparing locking hints in MySQL and SQL Server. In MySQL/Innodb LOCK IN SHARE MODE and SELECT FOR UPDATE are more than hints. Behavior will be different from normal SELECT statements. Here is simple example:

How much memory Innodb locks really take ?

After playing yesterday a bit with INSERT … SELECT I decided to check is Innodb locks are relly as efficient in terms of low resource usage as they are advertised. Lets start with a bit of background – in Innodb row level locks are implemented by having special lock table, located in the buffer pool […]

INSERT INTO … SELECT Performance with Innodb tables.

Everyone using Innodb tables probably got use to the fact Innodb tables perform non locking reads, meaning unless you use some modifiers such as LOCK IN SHARE MODE or FOR UPDATE, SELECT statements will not lock any rows while running. This is generally correct, however there a notable exception – INSERT INTO table1 SELECT * […]

To pack or not to pack – MyISAM Key compression

MyISAM storage engine has key compression which makes its indexes much smaller, allowing better fit in caches and so improving performance dramatically. Actually packed indexes not a bit longer rows is frequent reason of MyISAM performing better than Innodb. In this article I’ll get in a bit more details about packed keys and performance implications […]

Generating test data from the mysql> prompt

There are a lot of tools that generate test data.  Many of them have complex XML scripts or GUI interfaces that let you identify characteristics about the data. For testing query performance and many other applications, however, a simple quick and dirty data generator which can be constructed at the MySQL command line is useful. […]

Followup questions to ‘What’s new in Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6′ webinar

Thanks to all who attended my webinar yesterday.  The slides and recording are available on the webinar’s page.  I was a bit overwhelmed with the amount of questions that came in and I’ll try to answer them the best I can here. Q: Does Percona XtraDB Cluster support writing to multiple master? Yes, it does.  However, […]

The use of Iptables ClusterIP target as a load balancer for PXC, PRM, MHA and NDB

Most technologies achieving high-availability for MySQL need a load-balancer to spread the client connections to a valid database host, even the Tungsten special connector can be seen as a sophisticated load-balancer. People often use hardware load balancer or software solution like haproxy. In both cases, in order to avoid having a single point of failure, […]

When it’s faster to use SQL in MySQL NDB Cluster over memcache API

Memcache access for MySQL Cluster (or NDBCluster) provides faster access to the data because it avoids the SQL parsing overhead for simple lookups – which is a great feature. But what happens if I try to get multiple records via memcache API (multi-GET) and via SQL (SELECT with IN())? I’ve encountered this a few times […]

MySQL 5.6 vs MySQL 5.5 and the Star Schema Benchmark

So far most of the benchmarks posted about MySQL 5.6 use the sysbench OLTP workload.  I wanted to test a set of queries which, unlike sysbench, utilize joins.  I also wanted an easily reproducible set of data which is more rich than the simple sysbench table.  The Star Schema Benchmark (SSB) seems ideal for this. […]