October 25, 2014

Errant transactions: Major hurdle for GTID-based failover in MySQL 5.6

I have previously written about the new replication protocol that comes with GTIDs in MySQL 5.6. Because of this new replication protocol, you can inadvertently create errant transactions that may turn any failover to a nightmare. Let’s see the problems and the potential solutions. In short Errant transactions may cause all kinds of data corruption/replication […]

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

read_buffer_size can break your replication

There are some variables that can affect the replication behavior and sometimes cause some big troubles. In this post I’m going to talk about read_buffer_size and how this variable together with max_allowed_packet can break your replication. The setup is a master-master replication with the following values: max_allowed_packet = 32M read_buffer_size = 100M To break the […]

STOP: DELETE IGNORE on Tables with Foreign Keys Can Break Replication

DELETE IGNORE suppresses errors and downgrades them as warnings, if you are not aware how IGNORE behaves on tables with FOREIGN KEYs, you could be in for a surprise. Let’s take a table with data as example, column c1 on table t2 references column c1 on table t1 – both columns have identical set of rows for […]

Statement based replication with Stored Functions, Triggers and Events

Statement based replication writes the queries that modify data in the Binary Log to replicate them on the slave or to use it as a PITR recovery. Here we will see what is the behavior of the MySQL when it needs to log “not usual” queries like Events, Functions, Stored Procedures, Local Variables, etc. We’ll […]

Percona Replication Manager, a solution for MySQL high availability with replication using Pacemaker

The content of this article is outdated, look here for more up to date information. Over the last year, the frustration of many of us at Percona regarding issues with MMM has grown to a level where we started looking at other ways of achieving higher availability using MySQL replication. One of the weakness of […]

Can MySQL temporary tables be made safe for statement-based replication?

A while ago I wrote about how to make MySQL replication reliable, part of which is to eliminate temporary tables. The idea is this: if a slave is stopped (or crashed) while a temporary table is open and is then restarted, the temporary table doesn’t exist anymore, and the slave will have problems trying to […]

MySQL Replication vs DRBD Battles

Well these days we see a lot of post for and against (more, more) using of MySQL and DRBD as a high availability practice. I personally think DRBD has its place but there are far more cases when other techniques would work much better for variety of reasons. First let me start with Florian’s comments […]

Filtered MySQL Replication

To get this straight – I’m not a big fan of filtered or partial MySQL Replication (as of version MySQL 5.0) – there is enough gotchas with replication itself and getting things right with filtering can get quite bumpy road. In some applications however it is very helpful so lets see what one should do […]

Multi-Valued INSERTs, AUTO_INCREMENT & Percona XtraDB Cluster

A common migration path from standalone MySQL/Percona Server to a Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) environment involves some measure of time where one node in the new cluster has been configured as a slave of the production master that the cluster is slated to replace. In this way, the new cluster acts as a slave of […]