September 1, 2014

A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables

A recurring and very common customer issue seen here at the Percona Support team involves how to make the ibdata1 file “shrink” within MySQL. I can only imagine there’s a degree of regret by some of the InnoDB architects on their design decisions regarding disk-space management by the shared tablespace* because this has been a big […]

MariaDB: Selective binary logs events

In the first post in a series on MariaDB features we find interesting, we begin with selectively skipping replication of binlog events. This feature is available on MariaDB 5.5 and 10. By default when using MySQL’s standard replication, all events are logged in the binary log and those binary log events are replicated to all slaves […]

Q&A: Even More Deadly Mistakes of MySQL Development

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Even More Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars.  If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions.  I answered as many as we had […]

GTIDs in MySQL 5.6: New replication protocol; new ways to break replication

One of the MySQL 5.6 features many people are interested in is Global Transactions IDs (GTIDs). This is for a good reason: Reconnecting a slave to a new master has always been a challenge while it is so trivial when GTIDs are enabled. However, using GTIDs is not only about replacing good old binlog file/position […]

How to find bugs in MySQL

Finding bugs in MySQL is not only fun, it’s also something I have been doing the last four years of my life. Whether you want to become the next Shane Bester (who is generally considered the most skilled MySQL bug hunter worldwide), or just want to prove you can outsmart some of the world’s best […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

MySQL 5.6 New Replication Features: Webinar followup Q&A

I want to thank all attendees of my webinar, “MySQL 5.6 New Replication Features: Benefits, Challenges and Limitations“. We had questions that I didn’t have the time to answer: Q: If I run on Amazon’s RDS, do I need to worry about enabling crash-safe slaves, or is that already in place? A: Crash-safe replication is […]

High-availability options for MySQL, October 2013 update

The technologies allowing to build highly-available (HA) MySQL solutions are in constant evolution and they cover very different needs and use cases. In order to help people choose the best HA solution for their needs, we decided, Jay Janssen and I, to publish, on a regular basis (hopefully, this is the first), an update on […]

Using the new spatial functions in MySQL 5.6 for geo-enabled applications

Geo-enabled (or location enabled) applications are very common nowadays and many of them use MySQL. The common tasks for such applications are: Find all points of interests (i.e. coffee shops) around (i.e. a 10 mile radius) the given location (latitude and longitude). For example we want to show this to a user of the mobile […]

Here’s my favorite secret MySQL 5.6 feature. What’s yours?

MySQL 5.6 has a great many new features, including, but certainly not limited to a number of performance improvements. However, besides the widely talked-about features such as InnoDB support for full text search, optimizer, performance schema improvements and GTID, there are also a few tiny improvements that nobody cared to mention. One such feature is…