Search Results for: reading show innodb status

When does Innodb Start Transaction ?

When does Innodb Start Transaction ? The answer looks obvious – when you issue “BEGIN” command. This is however wrong answer from engine point of you. Run “SHOW INNODB STATUS” and you will see “not started” status in transaction list. It is only when you read (or write) to INNODB table you can see transaction […]

A quest for the full InnoDB status

When running InnoDB you are able to dig into the engine internals, look at various gauges and counters, see past deadlocks and the list of all open transactions. This is in your reach with one simple command —

. On most occasions it works beautifully. The problems appear when you have a large spike in […]

5 free handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication

MySQL Replication is very simple to set up. In this post I’ll discuss its importance and five handy tools for monitoring and managing MySQL replication. What is MySQL Replication? It’s the process of copying the (real-time events) data from one master instance to another slave instance and maintaining the redundant consistent data in a different […]

How to setup a PXC cluster with GTIDs (and have async slaves replicating from it!)

This past week was marked by a series of personal findings related to the use of Global Transaction IDs (GTIDs) on Galera-based clusters such as Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC). The main one being the fact that transactions touching MyISAM tables (and FLUSH PRIVILEGES!) issued on a giving node of the cluster are recorded on a GTID set […]

Optimizing MySQL for Zabbix

This blog post was inspired by my visit at the annual Zabbix Conference in Riga, Latvia this year, where I gave a couple of talks on MySQL and beyond. It was a two day single-track event with some 200 participants, a number of interesting talks on Zabbix (and related technologies) and really well-organized evening activities. […]

How to deal with MySQL deadlocks

A deadlock in MySQL happens when two or more transactions mutually hold and request for locks, creating a cycle of dependencies. In a transaction system, deadlocks are a fact of life and not completely avoidable. InnoDB automatically detects transaction deadlocks, rollbacks a transaction immediately and returns an error. It uses a metric to pick the […]