November 23, 2014

How to recover table structure from .frm files with MySQL Utilities

Table structures are stored in .frm files and in the InnoDB Data Dictionary. Sometimes, usually in data recovery issues, we need to recover those structures to be able to find the lost data or just to recreate the tables. There are different ways to do it and we’ve already written about it in this blog. […]

Spreading .ibd files across multiple disks; the optimization that isn’t

Inspired by Baron’s earlier post, here is one I hear quite frequently – “If you enable innodb_file_per_table, each table is it’s own .ibd file.  You can then relocate the heavy hit tables to a different location and create symlinks to the original location.” There are a few things wrong with this advice:

How innodb_open_files affects performance

Recently I looked at table_cache sizing which showed larger table cache does not always provides the best performance. So I decided to look at yet another similar variable – innodb_open_files which defines how many files Innodb will keep open while working in innodb_file_per_table mode. Unlike MyISAM Innodb does not have to keep open file descriptor […]

Working with many files and file system fragmentation

Working on performance optimization project (not directly MySQL related) we did a test – creating 100 files writing 4K in the random file for some time and when checking the read speed on the files we end up with, compared to just writing the file sequentially and reading it back. The performance difference was huge […]

MySQL Replication: ‘Got fatal error 1236′ causes and cures

MySQL replication is a core process for maintaining multiple copies of data – and replication is a very important aspect in database administration. In order to synchronize data between master and slaves you need to make sure that data transfers smoothly, and to do so you need to act promptly regarding replication errors to continue […]

Getting my hands dirty on an OpenStack lab

Like you all may know, OpenStack is currently one of the coolest open source projects, so I was thrilled when I was asked to manage the deployment of an OpenStack lab for internal Percona use. Starting from basically zero, I created tasks in our Jira and assigned them to a pool of volunteer consultants. As usual in […]

Benchmarking IBM eXFlash™ DIMM with sysbench fileio

Diablo Technologies engaged Percona to benchmark IBM eXFlash™ DIMMs in various aspects. An eXFlash™ DIMM itself is quite an interesting piece of technology. In a nutshell, it’s flash storage, which you can put in the memory DIMM slots. Enabled by Diablo’s Memory Channel Storage™ technology, this practically means low latency and some unique performance characteristics. These […]

High Availability with mysqlnd_ms on Percona XtraDB Cluster

This is the second part of my series on High Availability with mysqlnd_ms. In my first post, “Simple MySQL Master HA with mysqlnd_ms,” I showed a simple HA solution using asynchronous MySQL replication. This time we will see how to leverage an all-primary cluster where you can write to all nodes. In this post I used […]

Getting to know TokuDB for MySQL

During last April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, TokuDB celebrated it’s first full-year as an open source storage engine. I still remember reading the official announcement and the expectations it created one year ago. The premises were very interesting as it had the potential of helping MySQL manage “big data” in a way InnoDB just […]

How rows_sent can be more than rows_examined?

When looking at queries that are candidates for optimization I often recommend that people look at rows_sent and rows_examined values as available in the slow query log (as well as some other places). If rows_examined is by far larger than rows_sent, say 100 larger, then the query is a great candidate for optimization. Optimization could […]