September 30, 2014

Announcing Percona Server 5.1.65-14.0

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.1.65-14.0 on September 4th, 2012 (Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories). Based on MySQL 5.1.65, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.1.65-14.0 is now the current stable release in the 5.1 series. All of Percona‘s software is open-source and free, all the details of the release can […]

Announcing Percona Server 5.5.24-26.0

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.5.24-26.0 on June 1st, 2012 (Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories). Based on MySQL 5.5.24, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.5.24-26.0 is now the current stable release in the 5.5 series. All of Percona‘s software is open-source and free, all the details of the release can […]

Bug#12704861

As Mark pointed out, there isn’t a lot of detail in the release notes about what could potentially be a very serious problem that is fixed in MySQL 5.1.60. I’ll repeat here the full documentation from the release notes: “InnoDB Storage Engine: Data from BLOB columns could be lost if the server crashed at a precise […]

Data mart or data warehouse?

This is part two in my six part series on business intelligence, with a focus on OLAP analysis. Part 1 – Intro to OLAP Identifying the differences between a data warehouse and a data mart. (this post) Introduction to MDX and the kind of SQL which a ROLAP tool must generate to answer those queries. […]

Why you should ignore MySQL’s key cache hit ratio

I have not caused a fist fight in a while, so it’s time to take off the gloves. I claim that somewhere around of 99% of advice about tuning MySQL’s key cache hit ratio is wrong, even when you hear it from experts. There are two major problems with the key buffer hit ratio, and […]

Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons

Detailed review of Tokutek storage engine

(Note: Review was done as part of our consulting practice, but is totally independent and fully reflects our opinion) I had a chance to take look TokuDB (the name of the Tokutek storage engine), and run some benchmarks. Tuning of TokuDB is much easier than InnoDB, there only few parameters to change, and actually out-of-box […]

My “hot” list for next InnoDB features

Many InnoDB scalability problems seem fixed in InnoDB-plugin-1.0.3 and I expect InnoDB-plugin will run fine on 16-24 cores boxes for many workloads. And now it is time to look on systems with 32GB+ of RAM which are not rare nowadays. Working with real customer systems I have wish-list of features I would like to see […]

Should you move from MyISAM to Innodb ?

There is significant portion of customers which are still using MyISAM when they come to us, so one of the big questions is when it is feasible to move to Innodb and when staying on MyISAM is preferred ? I generally prefer to see Innodb as the main storage engine because it makes life much […]

How multiple disks can benefit for single client workload ?

Let us talk few more about disks. You might have read my previous post and Matt’s Reply and it looks like there are few more things to clarify and explain. Before I get to main topic of the article lets comment on IO vs Disk question. If you look at Disk Based databases all data […]