Search Results for: order by not using indexes

Possible optimization for sort_merge and UNION ORDER BY LIMIT

Every so often you need to perform sort results retrieved from MySQL when your WHERE clause goes beyound col=const values which would allow MySQL to still use second portion of the index for the order by. Ranges as well as IN lists make this optimization impossible, not even speaking about index merge optimization. Lets look […]

Duplicate indexes and redundant indexes

About every second application I look at has some tables which have redundant or duplicate indexes so its the time to speak about these a bit. So what is duplicate index ? This is when table has multiple indexes defined on the same columns. Sometimes it is indexes with different names, sometimes it is different […]

To pack or not to pack – MyISAM Key compression

MyISAM storage engine has key compression which makes its indexes much smaller, allowing better fit in caches and so improving performance dramatically. Actually packed indexes not a bit longer rows is frequent reason of MyISAM performing better than Innodb. In this article I’ll get in a bit more details about packed keys and performance implications […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL 5.6 Transportable Tablespaces best practices

In MySQL 5.6 Oracle introduced a Transportable Tablespace feature (copying tablespaces to another server) and Percona Server adopted it for partial backups which means you can now take individual database or table backups and your destination server can be a vanilla MySQL server. Moreover, since Percona Server 5.6, innodb_import_table_from_xtrabackup is obsolete as Percona Server also […]

How to deal with MySQL deadlocks

A deadlock in MySQL happens when two or more transactions mutually hold and request for locks, creating a cycle of dependencies. In a transaction system, deadlocks are a fact of life and not completely avoidable. InnoDB automatically detects transaction deadlocks, rollbacks a transaction immediately and returns an error. It uses a metric to pick the […]