October 23, 2014

A closer look at Percona Server 5.6

Yesterday we announced the GA release of Percona Server 5.6, the latest release of our enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Percona Server 5.6 is the best free MySQL alternative for demanding applications. Our third major release, Percona Server 5.6 offers all the improvements found in MySQL 5.6 Community Edition plus scalability, availability, backup, and security […]

Let’s talk about Percona Server 5.6: Enterprise Grade MySQL (webinar)

The new Percona Server 5.6 is the most manageable, highest performance, and most scalable version of MySQL available. Percona Server 5.6 is the best open source MySQL choice for enterprise-grade applications because it combines new features with the best features of Percona Server 5.5 and MySQL 5.6 to provide unparalleled performance. Join me tomorrow as […]

10 years of MySQL User Conferences

In preparing for this month’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, I’ve been reminiscing about the annual MySQL User Conference’s history – the 9 times it previously took place in its various reincarnations – and there are a lot of good things, fun things to remember. 2003 was the year that marked the first MySQL user conference […]

Distributed Set Processing with Shard-Query

Can Shard-Query scale to 20 nodes? Peter asked this question in comments to to my previous Shard-Query benchmark. Actually he asked if it could scale to 50, but testing 20 was all I could due to to EC2 and time limits. I think the results at 20 nodes are very useful to understand the performance: […]

Shard-Query turbo charges Infobright community edition (ICE)

Shard-Query is an open source tool kit which helps improve the performance of queries against a MySQL database by distributing the work over multiple machines and/or multiple cores. This is similar to the divide and conquer approach that Hive takes in combination with Hadoop. Shard-Query applies a clever approach to parallelism which allows it to […]

MySQL Replication vs DRBD Battles

Well these days we see a lot of post for and against (more, more) using of MySQL and DRBD as a high availability practice. I personally think DRBD has its place but there are far more cases when other techniques would work much better for variety of reasons. First let me start with Florian’s comments […]