November 27, 2014

How to debug long-running transactions in MySQL

Among the many things that can cause a “server stall” is a long-running transaction. If a transaction remains open for a very long time without committing, and has modified data, then other transactions could block and fail with a lock wait timeout. The problem is, it can be very difficult to find the offending code […]

Impact of the number of idle connections in MySQL

Be careful with my findings, I appear to have compile in debug mode, I am redoing the benchmarks. Updated version here. I recently had to work with many customers having large number of connections opened in MySQL and although I told them this was not optimal, I had no solid arguments to present. More than […]

Fighting MySQL Replication Lag

The problem of MySQL Replication unable to catch up is quite common in MySQL world and in fact I already wrote about it. There are many aspects of managing mysql replication lag such as using proper hardware and configuring it properly. In this post I will just look at couple of query design mistakes which […]

Debugging sleeping connections with MySQL

Have you ever seen connection in the SHOW PROCESSLIST output which is in “Sleep” state for a long time and you have no idea why this would happen ? I see if frequently with web applications and it is often indication of trouble. Not only it means you may run out of MySQL connections quicker […]

Percona XtraDB Cluster/ Galera with Percona Monitoring Plugins

The Percona Monitoring Plugins (PMP) provide some free tools to make it easier to monitor PXC/Galera nodes.  Monitoring broadly falls into two categories: alerting and historical graphing, and the plugins support Nagios and Cacti, respectively, for those purposes. Graphing An update to the PMP this summer (thanks to our Remote DBA team for supporting this!) added a Galera-specific host template that […]

Measuring Max Replication Throughput on Percona XtraDB Cluster with wsrep_desync

Checking throughput with async MySQL replication Replication throughput is the measure of just how fast the slaves can apply replication (at least by my definition).  In MySQL async replication this is important to know because the single-threaded apply nature of async replication can be a write performance bottleneck.  In a production system, we can tell […]

Is Replication Slave ever going to catch up? When?!

If you ever had a replication slave that is severely behind, you probably noticed that it’s not catching up with a busy master at a steady pace. Instead, the “Seconds behind master” is going up and down so you can’t really tell whether the replica is catching up or not by looking at just few […]

Quick comparison of MyISAM, Infobright, and MonetDB

Recently I was doing a little work for a client who has MyISAM tables with many columns (the same one Peter wrote about recently). The client’s performance is suffering in part because of the number of columns, which is over 200. The queries are generally pretty simple (sums of columns), but they’re ad-hoc (can access […]

How to calculate a good InnoDB log file size

Peter wrote a post a while ago about choosing a good InnoDB log file size.  Not to pick on Peter, but the post actually kind of talks about a lot of things and then doesn’t tell you how to choose a good log file size!  So I thought I’d clarify it a little. The basic […]

Living with backups

Everyone does backups. Usually it’s some nightly batch job that just dumps all MySQL tables into a text file or ordinarily copies the binary files from the data directory to a safe location. Obviously both ways involve much more complex operations than it would seem by my last sentence, but it is not important right […]